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Table of Contents
                            THE LOST KEY
	Contents
	Questions on the Symbolism
	I. The Hidden Meaning of the Masonic Symbolism
	II. The Symbolism of the Lodge Room
	III. The Lodge of the Holy Saints John at Jerusalem
	IV. The Great Lights
	V. The Apron
	VI. The Working Tools
	VII. The Metals
	VIII. The Third Degree
	IX. The Method of Teaching--The Subjective Mind
	X. The Drama of the Third Degree
	XI. The Three Parts of Masonry
	Index
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 2

First published 1927 e.v.
by Harry M. Welliver,
Seattle, WA., U.S.A.

Page 60

The Lost Key 56

167. Beginning at the bottom line of the square we find that this
symbolizes the lowest and basest of human qualities, Selfishness.
Rising from this bottom line are the two side lines which symbolize
the progress of development of the lower natures away from the
primitive and altogether hideous passion of unadulterated selfish-
ness. The bottom line, of course, represents “pure” selfishness, the
stark, unmitigated passion. The two side lines represent the two
methods of growth away from this wholly repulsive thing, but we
must remember that selfishness is not conquered all at once and so
the tinge and taint of it continues, growing less and less, until we
finally reach the top line, the line of Unselfishness.

168. Now what do the side lines mean? Simply this, that in our
development towards the great goal of spiritual enlightenment we
must progress by means of two different “lines” both of which are
constructive and which supplement each other. Both of these lines
must be followed, not one only, if we would have our characters
evenly developed. One is the line of the heart, of service to
humanity through love and sympathy, and the other is the line of
intellectual development. To follow one of these lines to the
exclusion of the other would make the character one-sided and im-
perfect. The man who is intellectually developed but in whom the
great throb of human suffering arouses no feeling of sympathy is
very apt to develop the quality of cruelty. Even if he does not do
this he leaves undeveloped and atrophied the great heart side of
his being.

169. The man who progresses by means of the heart and of
sympathy alone is also becoming one-sided, his heart being unbal-
anced by his intellect, is apt to lead him into emotional excesses
and he may become a bigot in religion, one of the greatest enemies
to real human progress. Both of these lines must be followed and
the development must be equalized in order to have the square of
our Apron properly formed. But when both lines are followed

Page 61

Chapter V. 57

intelligently and carefully then, in time, the top line is reached and
the Mason develops the wonderful quality of unselfishness, the top
line of the Apron, the line which lies next to the triangle of the
Spirit.

170. The top line of the square expresses the very opposite and
antithesis, as might be expected, of the bottom line. The Mason
who progresses by means of service to humanity prompted by the
great feeling of sympathy and balanced and kept from emotional
excesses and fanatically religious cul-de-sacs or what might be
called “blind alleys” up which bigotry and credulity will attempt to
lead him by the accompanying development of his intellect and
reason, that man is progressing in true Masonic manner, building
up the square of his Apron in a scientific way, the only way which
is in accord with the great Laws of the Universe.

THE TRIANGLE OF THE APRON

171. This brings us to the triangle of the Apron, the spiritual
nature, the lower line of which we take as symbolic of the great
quality, the spiritual quality, of LOVE. For the love which is
symbolized by the bottom line of the triangle is not the carnal,
passion-filled love of which we have so many evidences around us.
It is the pure, spiritual love, the love of spirit for spirit which Christ
emphasized in His answer to the lawyer related in Matthew 22:37
to the end of the chapter. Get out your New Testament and read
this passage carefully and you will find that Christ has told us that
Love is the fulfilling of the Law, that upon the Law of Love hang
all the other Laws and the Prophets.

172. In other words, he who understands the Law of Love and
obeys it need not bother about the rest of the commandments for
he will automatically obey them all, rising above them, since all
desire to break them will have left him. If this is so, and it is stated
not only in the above passage but in so many other places, not only

Page 119

Chapter XI. 115

the Ephesians.” Shall we say that this is untrue because we,
personally, do not believe in nor worship Diana? That would be as
logical as to reject the present explanation of the symbolism on the
grounds that we, personally, do not believe in Rebirth or in the
possibility of leaving the body during physical life.

324. The only logical objection is to point out where the present
explanation does not fit the facts of the symbolism as handed down
to us and the objector should indicate the discrepancies and give
an explanation which will not only fit the particular symbol but
will not violate the harmony of the rest of the symbolism. It should
also be remembered that an explanation should be pertinent—it
should bear uuon the case in hand—it should put the symbol in
such a light that we can see its bearing unon the rest of the
symbolism. The present writer believes that this explanation
preserves all of tbe “harmonies” and that, so far at least as the
"Educational" part of the symbolism is concerned, it should make
the lessons of Masonry a much more potent factor than they are at
present in the building up of character and the development of
morality.

Page 120

116

INDEX
Section
Allegory . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Altar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110-116
Apron . . 159-171, 193-196, 262-663
Arms . . . . . . . . . . . 78, 79, 83
Ashlar . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Bible . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
Body . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76, 83
Cable-Tow . . . . . . . . . . 313-315
Cement . . . . . . . . . . . . 259
Circumambulation . . . . . . 304
Clothing . . . . . . . . . . . . 62, 63
Compasses . . . . . . . . . . 129
Corn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253
Definitions . . . . . . . . . . 24-26
Discalceation . . . . . . . . . 98-107
Emblem . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Feet . . . . . . . . . . . . 73, 75, 83
Floor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37, 94
Gauge . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203
Gavel . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204
Grave . . . . . . . . . . . . . 289
Hands . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79, 83
Individuality . . . . . . . . . 67
Jerusalem . . . . . . . . . . . 86
John the Baptist . . . . . . . 53, 87
John the Evangelist . . . . . . 54, 89
Knee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
Laws, Natural . . . . . . . . . 39, 40
Legs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80, 83
Level . . . . . . . . . . 211, 212, 218
Light . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 276
Lights, Great . . . . . . . . . 124-150
Lights, Lesser . . . . . . 136, 149-158
Lodge . . . . . . . . . 36, 37, 45, 309
Love . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171-191
Masonry, Definitition of . . . 27

Purpose of . . . . . 44

Section
Masonry, Age of . . . . . . . 139, 140
Metals . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219-226
Mind, Subjective . . . . 68, 270-279

Lower . . . . . . . . . 67
Higher . . . . . . . . . 67
Abstract . . . . . . . . 69
Concrete . . . . . . . 69

Morality . . . . . . . . . . . . 30-31
Nature, Laws of . . . . . . . . 39-40
Oblong Square . . . . . . . . 93-97
Oil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253
Pavement . . . . . . . . . . . 313
Paw, Lion’s . . . . . . . . . . 291
Personality . . . . . . . . . . 67-74
Pillars . . . . . . . . . . . . . 309-311
Platforms . . . . . . . . . . . 47-50
Plumb . . . . . . . . . . 213-217, 218
Polarity . . . . . . . . . . . . 77, 311
Prayer . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Qualities . . . . . . . . . . . 224
Rap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90-91
Ruffians . . . . . . . . . . . . 288
Shoes . . . . . . . . . . 74, 75, 81, 84
Square . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127, 128
,, as Working Tool . . . 206
Stairs, winding . . . . . . . . 242-252
Subjective Mind . . . . . 68, 270-279
Symbol, Definition of . . . . 24

Nature of . . . . . . 24
Value of . . . . . . . 18

System, Definition of . . . . . 29
Trowel . . . . . . . . . . . . . 258
Wages . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253, 254
Wine . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253
Work, Masonic . . . . . . . . 275
Working Tools . . . . . . . . 199-218

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