Download The Book of Transformations PDF

TitleThe Book of Transformations
LanguageEnglish
File Size1.7 MB
Total Pages360
Table of Contents
                            One
Two
Three
Four
Five
Six
Seven
Eight
Nine
Ten
Eleven
Twelve
Thirteen
Fourteen
Fifteen
Sixteen
Seventeen
Eighteen
Nineteen
Twenty
Twenty-One
Twenty-Two
Twenty-Three
Twenty-Four
Twenty-Five
Twenty-Six
Twenty-Seven
Twenty-Eight
Twenty-Nine
Thirty
Thirty-One
Thirty-Two
Thirty-Three
Thirty-Four
Thirty-Five
Thirty-Six
Thirty-Seven
Thirty-Eight
Thirty-Nine
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 2

THE BOOK of
TRANSFORMATIONS
Legends of the Red Sun

Book Three

Page 180

TWENTY-TWO



Nestled into a private wooden booth at Bistro Júula, behind two giant potted
ferns, Fulcrom and Lan stared at each other across the half-dozen tea-light
candles. Fulcrom was in his finest woollen tunic, a dark green number with rural
motifs in the stitching, an outer-cloak he’d been saving for as long as he could
remember, and his boots were so clean he could see a reflection of himself in
their gleam.
Lan, in a high-collared long black dress with ornate lace patterns around the

hem, was an impressive presence. He wondered vaguely why she didn’t make
more of her athletic figure, but he assumed she was still in the habit of
concealing herself.
‘So should we be doing this?’ Fulcrom asked.
Lan shrugged. ‘We’re just discussing how to find Shalev, that’s all, while the

boys entertain themselves with lower-level ladies.’
‘Right,’ Fulcrom replied, noting her emphasis on the word lower. ‘They’re not

going to be out night, I hope? I mean, they must know about the indoor iren
opening tomorrow?’
‘Yes they do, stop being a control freak,’ Lan mocked. ‘Despite their bravado,

they do take it all seriously, especially since your lecture to them.’
‘I know, I know.’ Fulcrom leaned back in his chair. ‘It’s just that it’s only you

guys and the city guard there, and I don’t think they’re particularly good at
looking after themselves let alone protecting the event from Cavesiders.’
‘You’re starting to sound like one of the characters from a MythMaker

sketch.’
‘You read that rubbish?’ Fulcrom asked.
‘Sometimes, I do. You must admit they’re funny.’
‘I’ve never read one.’

Page 181

‘Then how would you know if they’re rubbish?’
‘A valid point,’ Fulcrom confessed.
‘Besides, the children of the city seem to love it. I vaguely remember talk of

them from years ago, but they went underground. There seem to be a lot of them
about now though.’
‘So I’ve noticed,’ Fulcrom grumbled. ‘I guess children need their heroes?’
‘Even adults,’ Lan remarked. ‘So it appears, at least.’
Fulcrom made a vague wave of his hands. ‘These are uncertain times,’ he

said. ‘What with the ice age really settling in, the reports of genocide, and the
war that’s going on in Villiren, people need to believe in . That the
Knights exist gives them deep comfort. It gives them a focus. Did you know,
people even stop us investigators on the street to tell us how appreciative they
are of you.’
Lan gave a cute smile, and there was something about her manner that said

here was affirmation that she was doing more than just fighting crime, that she
was happy to be a symbol.

*

Fulcrom came from a long line of extroverts, and found being around others to
be hugely comforting. He could absorb their energy, enjoyed observing their
quirks and mannerisms and making huge generalizations about their lives.
Throughout his childhood, his mother and his father would constantly guffaw
across the dinner table, make jokes with pats on backs and discussions of the
day. They were a tight-knit and outrageous bunch, Bohr rest their souls. And it
made sitting across from Lan all the more interesting, because clearly she had
spent much of her life trying not to say anything – doubly interesting, because he
noted how with , she was the one initiating conversations, prodding him on
his past and his tastes. She laughed when he spoke of things he knew weren’t

funny.
If he read people as well as he thought he could, these were encouraging

signs.
But Fulcrom also felt uneasy for any number of reasons. Of course there was

his private knowledge of Lan: she used to be anatomically male, and no matter
how liberal and open-minded Fulcrom considered himself, no matter how good
the cultists had been, that thought existed. A lot of it was new to him, too – he
had studied as best he could to understand notions of what made someone a man
or a woman or one of the shades in between; he tried to understand how
someone’s gender and sex could be different, but found such matters to be

Page 359

First published 2011 by Tor

This electronic edition published 2011 by Tor
an imprint of Pan Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited

Pan Macmillan, 20 New Wharf Road, London N1 9RR
Basingstoke and Oxford

Associated companies throughout the world
www.panmacmillan.com

ISBN 978-0-230-76082-0 EPUB

Copyright © Mark Charan Newton 2011

The right of Mark Charan Newton to be identified as the author of this work has been asserted by him in
accordance with the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988.

You may not copy, store, distribute, transmit, reproduce or otherwise make available this publication (or
any part of it) in any form, or by any means (electronic, digital, optical, mechanical, photocopying,

recording or otherwise), without the prior written permission of the publisher. Any person who does any
unauthorized act in relation to this publication may be liable to criminal prosecution and civil claims for

damages.

A CIP catalogue record for this book is available from the British Library.

Visit to read more about all our books and to buy them. You will also find
features, author interviews and news of any author events, and you can sign up for e-newsletters so that

you’re always first to hear about our new releases.

http://www.panmacmillan.com
http://www.panmacmillan.com

Similer Documents