Download The Book of Disquiet: The Complete Edition PDF

TitleThe Book of Disquiet: The Complete Edition
Author
LanguageEnglish
File Size7.8 MB
Total Pages392
Table of Contents
                            Half Title Page
Title Page
Contents
Introduction
Editor’s note
THE BOOK OF DISQUIET: First Phase
	Preface [1917?]
	1 [1913?]
	2 [1913?]
	3 [1913?]
	4 [1913?]
	5 [1913?]
	6 [1913]
	7 [1913?]
	8 [1913?]
	9 [1913?]
	10 [1913?]
	11 [1913?]
	12 [1913?]
	13 [1913?]
	14 [1913?]
	15 [1913?]
	16 [1913?]
	17 [1913?]
	18 [1913?]
	19 [1913?]
	20 [1913?]
	21 [1913?]
	22 [1913?]
	23 [1913?]
	24 [1913?]
	25 [1913?]
	26 [1913?]
	27 [1913?]
	28 [1913?]
	29 [1913?]
	30 [after 10 May 1913]
	31 [after 10 May 1913]
	32 [c. 15 May 1913]
	33 [1913?]
	34 [1913?]
	35 [1913?]
	36 [August 1913]
	37 [1913?]
	38 [1913?]
	39 [1913]
	40 [1913?]
	41 [1913?]
	42 [after 12 Sep 1913]
	43 [1913?]
	44 [1913?]
	45 [1913?]
	46 [1913?]
	47 [1914?]
	48 [1914?]
	49 [1914?]
	50 [1914?]
	51 [1914?]
	52 [1914?]
	53 [1914?]
	54 [1914?]
	55 [1914?]
	56
	57 [1914?]
	58 [1914?]
	59 [1914?]
	60 [1914?]
	61 [1914?]
	62 [1914?]
	63 [c. 29 Oct 1914]
	64 [after 31 Oct 1914]
	65 [after 31 Oct 1914]
	66 [1914?]
	67 [1914?]
	68 [1914?]
	69 [1914?]
	70 [1914?]
	71 [1914?]
	72 [1914?]
	73 [1914?]
	74 [1914?]
	75 [1914]
	76 [1914?]
	77 [1914?]
	78 [1914?]
	79 [1914?]
	80 [1914?]
	81 [1914?]
	82 [1915?]
	83 [1915?]
	84 [c. 7 Jan 1915]
	85 [1915?]
	86 [1915?]
	87 [1915?]
	88 [1915?]
	89 [1915?]
	90 [1915?]
	91 [1915?]
	92 [1915?]
	93 [1915?]
	94 [1915?]
	95 [1915?]
	96 [1915?]
	97 [1915?]
	98 [1915?]
	99 [1915?]
	100 [1915?]
	101 [1915?]
	102 [1915?]
	103 [1915?]
	104 [1915?]
	105 [1915?]
	106 [1915?]
	107 [1915?]
	108 [1915?]
	109 [1915?]
	110 [1915?]
	111 [1915?]
	112 [1915?]
	113 [1915?]
	114 [1915?]
	115 [1915?]
	116 [1915?]
	117 [1915?]
	118 [1915?]
	119 [1915?]
	120 [1915?]
	121 [1916?]
	122 [1916?]
	123 [1916?]
	124 [1916?]
	125 [1916?]
	126 [after July 1916]
	127 [1916?]
	128 [1916?]
	129 [1916?]
	130 [1916?]
	131 18 July 1916
	132 [1916?]
	133 [1916?]
	134 [1917?]
	135 [1917]
	136 [1917]
	137 [1917?]
	138 [1917?]
	139 [18 Sep 1917]
	140 [1917?]
	141 [1917?]
	142 [1917?]
	143 [1917?]
	144 [1917?]
	145 [1918?]
	146 [1918?]
	147 [1918?]
	148 [1918?]
	149 [1918?]
	150 [1918?]
	151 [1918?]
	152 [1918?]
	153 [1918?]
	154 [1918?]
	155 [8 Oct 1919]
	156 [1919?]
	157 [c. 12 Jan 1920]
	158 [1920?]
	159 [1920?]
	160 [c. 13 Jan 1920]
	161 [1920?]
	162 [1920?]
THE BOOK OF DISQUIET: Second Phase
	163 [29 Mar 1930]
	164 [after 15 Jan 1929]
	165 [1929?]
	166 [22 Mar 1929]
	167 [1929?]
	168 [1929?]
	169 [1929?]
	170 [1929?]
	171 [1929?]
	172 [1929?]
	173 [1929?]
	174 [1929?]
	175 [1929?]
	176 [1929?]
	177 [1929?]
	178 [1929?]
	179 [1929?]
	180 [1929?]
	181 [1929?]
	182 [1929?]
	183 [after 31 May 1929]
	184 [1929?]
	185 [1929?]
	186 [1929?]
	187 [Spring 1929?]
	188 [1929?]
	189 [1929?]
	190 [1929?]
	191 [1929?]
	192 [1929?]
	193 [1929?]
	194 [1929?]
	195 [1929?]
	196 [1929?]
	197 [1929?]
	198 [1929?]
	199 [1929?]
	200 [1929?]
	201 [1929?]
	202 [1929?]
	203 [1929?]
	204 [1929?]
	205 [1929?]
	206 [1929?]
	207 [1929?]
	208 [1929?]
	209 [1929?]
	210 [1929?]
	211 [1929?]
	212 [1929?]
	213 [1929?]
	214 [1929?]
	215 [1929?]
	216 [25 Dec 1929]
	217 [1929?]
	218 [1929?]
	219 [1929?]
	220 [5 Feb 30]
	221 [21 Feb 1930]
	222 [14 Mar 1930]
	223
	224 [23 Mar 1930]
	225 [c. 23 Mar 1930]
	226 [c. 23 Mar 1930]
	227 [24 Mar 1930]
	228 [29 Mar 1930]
	229 [c. 4 Apr 1930}
	230 [5 Apr 1930]
	231 [5 Apr 1930]
	232 [6 Apr 1930]
	233 [10 Apr 1930]
	234 [10 Apr 1930]
	235 [12 Apr 1930]
	236 [13 Apr 1930]
	237 [14 Apr 1930]
	238 [21 Apr 1930]
	239 [23 Apr 1930]
	240 [25 Apr 1930]
	241 [25 Apr 1930]
	242 [c. 4/1930]
	243 [c. 4/1930]
	244 [c. 4/1930]
	245 [c. 4/1930]
	246 [6 May 1930]
	247 [14 May 1930]
	248 [15 May 1930]
	249 [18 May 1930]
	250 [12 June 1930]
	251 [13 June 1930]
	252 [c. 13 June 1930]
	253 [27 June 1930]
	254 [June/July 1930]
	255 [16 July 1930]
	256 [20 July 1930]
	257 [c. 24 July 1930]
	258 [25 July 1930]
	259 [c. 27 July 1930]
	260 [27 July 1930]
	261 [10 Dec 1930]
	262 [1930?]
	263 [1930?]
	264 [1930?]
	265 [1930?]
	266 [1930?]
	267 [1930?]
	268 [1930?]
	269 [1930?]
	270 [1930?]
	271 [1930?]
	272 [1930?]
	273 [1930?]
	274 [1930?]
	275 [1930?]
	276 [1930?]
	277 [1930?]
	278 [1930?]
	279 [1930?]
	280 [1930?]
	281 [1930?]
	282 [1930?]
	283 [1930?]
	284 [1930?]
	285 [1930?]
	286 [1930?]
	287 [1930?]
	288 [1930?]
	289 [1930?]
	290 [1930?]
	291 [1930?]
	292 [1930?]
	293 [1930?]
	294 [1930?]
	295 [1930?]
	296 [1930?]
	297 [1930?]
	298 [1930?]
	299 [1930?]
	300 [1930?]
	301 [1930?]
	302 [1930?]
	303 [8 Jan 1931]
	304 [1 Feb 1931]
	305 [2 Feb 1931]
	306 [10 Mar 1931]
	307 [8 Apr 1931]
	308 [c. 27 May 1931]
	309 [c. 27 May 1931]
	310 [18 June 1931]
	311 [20 June 1931]
	312 [10 June 1931]
	313 [1 July 1931]
	314 [13 July 1931]
	315 [22 Aug 1931]
	316 [2 Sep 1931]
	317 [3 Sep 1931]
	318 [10 and 11 Sep 1931]
	319 [14 Sep 1931]
	320 [15 Sep 1931]
	321 [16 Sep 1931]
	322 [7 Oct 1931]
	323 [16 Oct 1931]
	324 [after 18 Oct 1931]
	325 [after 18 Oct 1931]
	326 [after 18 Oct 1931]
	327 [after 18 Oct 1931]
	328 [after 18 Oct 1931]
	329 [c. 21 Oct 1931]
	330 [c. 21 Oct 1931]
	331 [c. 21 Oct 1931]
	332 [4 Nov 1931]
	333 [29 Nov 1931]
	334 [November 1931]
	335 [1 Dec 1931]
	336 [1 Dec 1931]
	337 [1 Dec 1931]
	338 [3 Dec 1931]
	339 [16 Dec 1931]
	340 [20 Dec 1931]
	341 [1931?]
	342 [1931?]
	343 [1931?]
	344 [1931?]
	345 [1931?]
	346 [1931?]
	347 [1931?]
	348 [1931?]
	349 [1931?]
	350 [1931?]
	351 [1931?]
	352 [1931?]
	353 [1931?]
	354 [1931?]
	355 [1931?]
	356 [1931?]
	357 [1931?]
	358 [1931?]
	359 [1931?]
	360 [1931?]
	361 [1931?]
	362 [1931?]
	363 [1931?]
	364 [1931?]
	365 [1931?]
	366 [1931?]
	367 [1931?]
	368 [1931?]
	369 [1931?]
	370 [1931?]
	371 [1931]
	372 [1931?]
	373 [1931?]
	374 [1931?]
	375 [17 Jan 1932]
	376 [26 Jan 1932]
	377 [29 Jan 1932]
	378 [5 Feb 1932]
	379 [c. 5 Feb 1932]
	380 [16 Mar 1932]
	381 [28 Mar 1932]
	382 [2 May 1932]
	383 [15 May 1932]
	384 [23 May 1932]
	385 [31 May 1932]
	386 [7 June 1932]
	387 [11 June 1932]
	388 [14 June 1932]
	389 [23 June 1932]
	390 [16 July 1932]
	391 [25 July 1932]
	392 [after 4 Aug 1932]
	393 [28 Sep 1932]
	394 [28 Sep 1932]
	395 [2 Nov 1932]
	396 [28 Nov 1932]
	397 [c. November 1932]
	398 [13 Dec 1932]
	399 [30 Dec 1932]
	400 [1932?]
	401 [1932?]
	402 [1932?]
	403 [1932?]
	404 [1932?]
	405 [1932?]
	406 [1932?]
	407 [1932?]
	408 [1932?]
	409 [1932?]
	410 [1932?]
	411 [1932?]
	412 [23 Mar 1933]
	413 [29 Mar 1933]
	414 [5 Apr 1933]
	415 [7 Apr 1933]
	416 [29 Aug 1933]
	417 [8 Sep 1933]
	418 [19 Sep 1933]
	419 [2 Nov 1933]
	420 [23 Dec 1933]
	421 [1933?]
	422 [1933?]
	423 [1933?]
	424 [31 Mar 1934]
	425 [5 June 1934]
	426 [9 June 1934]
	427 [c. 19 June 1934]
	428 [21 June 1934]
	429 [29 June 1934]
	430 [c. 29 June 1934]
	431 [26 July 1934]
	432 [c. 26 July 1934]
	433 [1934?]
	434 [1934?]
	435 [1934?]
	436 [1934?]
	437 [1934?]
	438 [1934?]
Appendices to the Book of Disquiet
	TWO NOTES
	[1929?]
	[1931?]
	FICTIONS OF THE INTERLUDE
	[1929?]
	[1929?]
	[1929?]
Copyright
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 196

familiar shopfronts had a sterile sweetness, and the usual passersby walked in a
city parallel to mine, like sailors given shore leave the night before.

Since the office was still open at that hour, I hurried back there to the evident
surprise of the other employees whom I had already said goodbye to for the day.
Back already? Yes, back already. I was free to feel again, alone with those
people who accompanied me in all but spirit … It was in a way like being at
home, that is, in the one place where one does not have feelings.

I woke very early this morning in a sudden tangle of confusion and slowly sat up
in bed feeling suffocated by an incomprehensible sense of tedium. It was
provoked neither by a dream nor by any reality. It was a feeling of absolute, utter
tedium that had its roots in something or other. In the dark depths of my soul,
invisible unknown forces engaged in a battle in which my being was the
battleground, and the whole of me was shaken by this secret struggle. With my
waking was born a physical nausea for all of life. A horror at having to live
awoke and sat up with me in bed. Everything rang hollow to me and I was filled
with the cold realization that every problem, whatever it might be, would prove
insoluble.

A terrible anxiety gripped and shook my smallest gesture. I felt afraid I
might go mad, not from madness, but just from being there. My whole body was
a suppressed scream. My heart was beating as if it were sobbing.

In my bare feet, in long, faltering strides that I vainly tried to make other
than they were, I walked the short length of my room and traced an empty
diagonal across the room beside mine, which has a door in the corner that opens
onto the corridor. As my movements became more uncontrolled and imprecise, I
accidentally knocked the brushes on the dressing table, bumped against a chair
and, once, my swinging hand struck the harsh iron of the bedstead. I lit a
cigarette that I smoked without thinking and only when I saw that ash had fallen
on the pillow — but how could it when I hadn’t even lain down there? — did I
realize that I was possessed (or at least in some state analogous in effect if not in
name) and that the consciousness I would normally have had of myself had
become fused with the void.

I received the coming of morning, the tenuous cold light that lends a vague
bluish whiteness to the emergent horizon, like a grateful kiss from the world. For
that light, that true day, freed me, freed me from something, offered a supportive

Page 197

arm to my as yet unvisited old age, patted my false childhood on the head, gave
shelter to the beggarly repose of my overflowing sensibility.

What a morning this is that wakes me both to the brutishness of life and to its
overwhelming tenderness! I could almost cry to see the light growing before and
beneath me in the old narrow street, and when the shutters on the grocer’s shop
on the corner turn a dirty brown in the almost glaring light, my heart feels a
fairy-tale sense of relief, and the security of not feeling begins to seep back into
me.

What a morning this pain brings with it! And what shadows retreat before it?
What mysteries were unfolded? None: just the sound of the first tram like a
match illuminating the darkness of my soul, and the firm steps of my first
passerby, the friendly voice of physical reality telling me not to upset myself so.

Once the last of the rain had dwindled until only intermittent drops fell from the
eaves of roofs, and the reflected blue of the sky appeared along the cobbled
center of the street, the traffic took up a different song, louder and gayer, and
there was the sound of windows being opened to greet the return of the forgetful
sun. Then, down the narrow street, from the next corner along, came the loud cry
of the lottery seller, and the sound of nails being hammered into boxes in the
shop next door reverberated about the bright space.

It was like an optional holiday, quite legal, but observed by no one. Rest and
work lived alongside one another, and I had absolutely nothing to do. I’d got up
early and lingered over my preparations for existence. I walked from one side of
the room to the other, dreaming out loud of unconnected, impossible things —
gestures I had forgotten to make, impossible ambitions only randomly realized,
long, steadfast conversations which, had I had them, would have taken place.
And in this reverie devoid of all grandeur and calm, in this hopeless, endless
dawdling, my pacing feet wasted away my free morning, and my words, uttered
out loud in a quiet voice, multiplied as they reverberated round the cloister of my
simple isolation.

Seen from outside, my human figure appeared ridiculous in the way that
everything human is when seen in private. Over the simple vestments of
abandoned sleep I’d put on an ancient overcoat that I wear for these morning
vigils. My old slippers, especially the left one, were badly split. And, with long
decisive steps, my hands in the pockets of my posthumous coat, I walked the

Page 391

Copyright © 2017 by Margaret Jull Costa Copyright © 2013 by Jerónimo Pizarro

All rights reserved. Except for brief passages quoted in a newspaper, magazine, radio, television, or website
review, no part of this book may be reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical,
including photocopying and recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without
permission in writing from the Publisher.

First published in this arrangement in Portuguese by Tinta-da-china as Livro do desassossego in 2013.

Obra publicada com o apoio do Camões—Instituto da Cooperação e da Língua I.P. (Published with the
support of Camões—Instituto da Cooperação e da Língua I.P.) Manufactured in the United States of
America
First published by New Directions clothbound in 2017
Design by Erik Rieselbach

Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Date to come Names: Pessoa, Fernando, 1888–1935,
author. | Pizarro, Jerónimo, editor. | Costa, Margaret Jull, translator.
Title: The book of disquiet : the complete edition / Fernando Pessoa ; edited by Jerónimo Pizarro ;
translated from the Portuguese by Margaret Jull Costa.
Other titles: Livro do desassossego. English
Description: First edition. | New York : New Directions Publishing Corporation, 2017. | First published in
Portuguese as Livro do desassossego.
Identifiers: LCCN 2017000589 | I SBN 9780811226936 (alk. paper) Subjects: LCSH : Pessoa, Fernando,
1888–1935. | Poets, Portuguese—20th century — Biography.
Classification: LCC PQ9261.P417 Z46213 2017 | DDC 869.1/41 [B] —dc23
LC record available at https://lccn.loc.gov/2017000589

eISBN: 9780811226943

New Directions Books are published for James Laughlin by New Directions Publishing Corporation

80 Eighth Avenue, New York 10011

Page 392

NEW DIRECTIONS TITLES AVAILABLE AS EBOOKS





Over eighty years of independent publishing.
ndbooks.com

http://www.ndbooks.com/book/compass/
http://www.ndbooks.com/book/a-simple-story/
http://www.ndbooks.com/book/vengeance-is-mine-all-others-pay-cash/
http://www.ndbooks.com/book/the-little-buddhist-monk-the-proof/
http://www.ndbooks.com/

Similer Documents