Download “Notes and News.” Journal of Egyptian Archaeology 13 (1927), pp. 79–83 (mentioning G 7000 X Hetepheres excavations). PDF

Title“Notes and News.” Journal of Egyptian Archaeology 13 (1927), pp. 79–83 (mentioning G 7000 X Hetepheres excavations).
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Page 1

THE JOURNAL

O F

EGYPTIAN ARCHAEOLOGY

VOLUME XIII

P U B L I S H E D BY

T H E E G Y P T E X P L O R A T I O N S O C I E T Y
13 TAVISTOCK SQUARE, W.C. 1

L O N D O N

1 9 2 7

Page 2

C O N T E N T S

EDOUARD NAVILLE

T H E OINTMENT SPOONS IN THE EGYPTIAN S E C ­

TION OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM

NOTES ON THE CHRONOLOGY OF THE ROMAN

EMPERORS FROM VALERIAN TO DIOCLETIAN

SOME FURTHER MELETIAN DOCUMENTS

T H E H E A D OF AN O L D MAN ( N O . 37883) IN THE
BRITISH MUSEUM

A MARRIAGE SETTLEMENT OF THE TWENTIETH

DYNASTY. A N U N P U B L I S H E D DOCUMENT

FROM T U R I N

MAKING A MUMMY

N O T E ON THE N A T U R E AND D A T E OF THE

" P A P Y R I " OF N A K H T , B . M . 10471 AND 10473

T H R E E HIPPOPOTAMUS-FIGURES OF THE M I D D L E

KINGDOM

T H E FAMILY LETTERS OF PANISKOS

A N ADMINISTRATIVE LETTER OF PROTEST

H E A D OF A MONARCH OF THE TUTHMOSID HOUSE,

IN THE BRITISH MUSEUM

T H E ALEXANDRIAN COINAGE OF AUGUSTUS

CHRISTIAN N U B I A

T H E EPIKRISIS RECORD OF AN EPHEBE OF A N -

TINOOPOLIS FOUND AT KARANIS

O N TWO MUMMIES FORMERLY BELONGING TO THE

D U K E OF SUTHERLAND

COPPER IN ANCIENT EGYPT

ALEXANDRIA

M H N A P O T S I A A H O S

SOME PHILOLOGICAL AND OTHER NOTES

PAGE

H. R . Hall 1

Madeleine Fredericq ... .. . 7

Harold Mattirigly 14
W. E. Cram 19

H. R. Hall 27

J. Cerny and T . Eric Poet ... 30

Warren R. Dawson ... ... 40

S . R. K . Glanville 50

H. R . Hall 57

J. G. Winter 59

Alan H. Gardiner ... .. . 75

H. R. Hall 133

J. Grafton Milne 135

J. W. Crowfoot 141

A. E. R . Boak 151

Warren R. Dawson .. . . . . 155

A. Lucas 162

H. I. Bell 171

A. E. R . Boak 185

Aylward M. Blackman 187

Page 3

VI C O N T E N T S

PAGE
T H E ABYDOS DECREE OF SETI I AT N A U R I . . . F. LI. Griffith 1 9 3

PRELIMINARY REPORT ON THE EXCAVATIONS AT

T E L L EL-'AMARNAH, 1926-7 H. Frankfort 209

A PARALLEL TO WILCKEN, Ghrest. 144 W . Schubart and H. I . Bell . . . 219

A N H U M P E D B U L L OF IVORY G. D. Hornblower 222

F I V E GREEK INSCRIPTIONS FROM N U B I A . . . J . W . Crowfoot 226

T H E MATHEMATICAL LEATHER ROLL IN THE

BRITISH MUSEUM S . R . K. Glanville 232

SOME PREDYNASTIC CARVINGS G. D. Hornblower 240

BIBLIOGRAPHY : GRAECO-ROMAN EGYPT. A . H. I . Bell, A . D. Nock and H. J . M .
PAPYRI (1924-1926) Milne 84

BIBLIOGRAPHY : GREEK INSCRIPTIONS (1925-

1926) Marcus N . Tod 247

BIBLIOGRAPHY: CHRISTIAN EGYPT (1926-1927) De Lacy O'Leary 251

NOTES AND N E W S 79, 261

NOTICES OF RECENT PUBLICATIONS 122, 268

L I S T OF PLATES 283

L I S T OF ILLUSTRATIONS IN THE T E X T 286

NOTICES OF RECENT PUBLICATIONS, DETAILED LIST 287

I N D E X 288

Page 4

NOTES AND NEWS

The work of the Society's expedition party a t Tell el-'Amamah has been attended
with considerable success. Mr. Frankfort reached the site about November 22nd, 1926,
and was joined later by Mr. Glanville, whose knowledge of the site from previous ex-
perience proved of great assistance, and the Society was fortunate in once more securing
the services of Mr. H. B. Clark, who worked there during the season 1924-25 as drafts-
man and architect under Mr. F. G. Newton. The excavations were chiefly devoted to
the northern part of the site, where valuable archaeological and architectural evidence
was obtained, especially in the precincts of the temple excavated in part by Professor
Petrie in 1891. Several objects of great interest were discovered, among them a limestone
altar-piece on which are incised figures of the King, the Queen and Meritaten, some
bronze temple vessels, a beautiful head of one of the princesses in red quartzite, and a
pottery rattle in the shape of a gazelle. Many of the most interesting objects are being
retained by the Cairo Museum, but the head of the princess may possibly be on exhibi-
tion in London during the summer, though unfortunately i t has to be returned to the
Cairo collection after exhibition.

Mrs. N. de Garis Davies was in the camp for some weeks copying the beautiful fres-
coes in the northern palace before they were removed. Mrs. Frankfort undertook the
most difficult part of the work of removal with complete success, and i t is largely due to
her delicate handling that they have been safely detached, and though, again, the Cairo
Museum is retaining the best fragments, some will be on exhibition with the other
objects this summer. Another special feature of the summer exhibition will be the
facsimile copies of the original frescoes made by Mrs. Davies for the volume on
Mural Decoration a t Tell el-'Amamah which is to be a memorial to the late Mr. F. G.
Newton. Mr. Clark was fully occupied making plans and drawings for the final publica-
tion of the site generally. It is much to be regretted that the Society is to lose his
expert services. Mr. Frankfort, after having attended to the final division of the antiqui-
ties and to their packing and despatch, went to Abydos to complete and prepare for

the notes made last season on the Cenotaph of Seti I . Mr. Glanville, whose
official leave was a t an end, returned to the British hluseum, while Mr. Clark went on to
join Dr. Nelson.

At Abydos, though the ~hotographic survey received sundry checks a t the beginning
of the season, work was in full swing early in January. The installation of an electric
plant has greatly accelerated operations and Mr. Felton hopes to bring home some
hundreds of negatives when the work is closed down in April. Mr. Faulkner has been
very fully occupied in the recording of the photographs and on the philological and
archaeological side of the work.

The lectures on "Cities of Egypt," so far as they have been delivered, have proved
particularly attractive. The first of the series, given by Dr. H. R. Hall on October 20th,
1926, on Thebes, was supplemented with a wealth of excellent lantern slides. Dr. A. M.
Blackman lectured on Herakleopolis on November 17th, laying special stress on the

Page 5

80 NOTES AND NEWS

religious development of the town. Owing to the fact tha t most of those who had
promised lectures were in Egypt no other could be arranged till February 23rd, 1927,
when Mr. H. I. Bell gave an extremely interesting one on Alexandria, followed on
March 16th by Dr. D. G. Hogarth on Naukratis. The two last of the series, Memphis,
by Mr. S. R. K. Glanville, and Sais, by Professor Newberry, a t the time of going to
press, have not yet been delivered.

Mr. Somers Clarke died on August 31st, 1926, aged 85 years. Born in Brighton on
July 22nd, 1841, and trained as an architect, he was long in partnership with Mr. J. T.
Micklethwaite, a well-known authority on western architecture, and in 1897 was appointed
surveyor of the fabric of S t Paul's Cathedral, an office which he retained till 1922. I n
1892 he made the acquaintance of the late Mr. S. S. Tylor, and visited Egypt with him,
spending some time a t El-Kbb, the place which was ultimately to become his home.
The two friends thereafter cooperated to record the monuments of El-KBb, publishing
three tombs and the small temple of Amenophis I11 in large folio volumes. Somers
Clarke took part in Quibell's excavations a t the same place in 1897 and afterwards
(1897-1899), with Quibell and Green, in the wonderful discoveries of very early royal
monuments a t Hieraconpolis on the opposite bank. He also rnade plans and restorations
of the two temples a t D&r el-Bahari after their excavation by our Society, but unhappily
was too late t o preserve the plan of the old monastery from which the site derives its
name. I n 1912 appeared his most important work, Chrzstian Antiquities i n the Nile
Valley, describing monastic buildings and churches which he had vibited a t various times
in Egypt as well as in Kubia and the Sudan on an expedition with Professor Sayce in
1909-1910. He contributed a valuable paper on the famous town walls of El-KBb to
Volume VII of this Journal. Sorners Clarke was interested also in Moorish and Arab
architecture and served on the ComitS, de conservation des monuments de I'art arabe.
His remarks on the injuries done in the name of archaeology to architectural history by
excavators and restorers were many and pungent. It is satisfactory to learn tha t his
observations concerning the methods of the ancient builders, which he began t o put into
shape in his old age, will appear before long in the work of a skilled collaborator. Over
twenty years ago he built hinlself a beautiful house in the solitudes of Meharnid, close to
El-Kbb, where he lived hospitably with his excellent Nubian servant and interpreter,
Dafid Hasan of Argin, latterly going no further in the sunlrrler than to his other
Egyptian residence a t Heliopolis. A few days before hir death he was removed from
Heliopolis to Ilehamid, desiring to be buried in a tomb constructed for himself long
before in a cemetery which he gave to the inhabitants of the village. Plate ii, Pig. 4, for
which we are indebted to Dr. H. R. Hall, shows him a t the temple of Amenophis 111,
holding the measuring pole which was his invariable colnpanion in his expeditions.

The death of Professor Valdemar Schmidt a t the age of 90 has removed the doyen of
Egyptologists in his time. He was born on January 7, 1836. in the village of Hamnlel
in North Jutland. His was a familiar figure not only in Copenhagen, but also in Egypt
and in London, as he had English connexions, and was often over here. Once a year
even to the end of his days he paid a visit to London and was to be seen seated on a
small camp-chair in the Egyptian Gallery of the British Xuseum, copying some funerary
text, his chief interest being in the coffins and their inscriptions. His major work, Leven
og Dddelz i ga~nle Egypten, with its supplement Sarkofager, Mun~ielzkister og -hylstre, is a
useful collection of illustrations of the styles of the different periods. He was for many

Page 6

NOTES AND NEWS �

years keeper of the Ny-Carlsberg Egyptian collection, in which post he has been succeeded
by Miss Maria Mogensen. The existing catalogue of the collection and the edition of its
inscriptions are due to him. He was a constant traveller between Denmark and Egypt,
and is once said (though we do not vouch for the authenticity of the tale) to have gone
all the way back from Copenhagen to Cairo to recover a favourite umbrella, which on
his arrival a t home he found he had left behind. He was a good example of the savant
of the old school. The photograph, P1. ii, Fig. 3 (facing p. 6), which is excellent, shows
him amid characteristic surroundings.

Yet another heavy misfortune has befallen Egyptology in the untimely death of
Henri Sottas. Sottas was born in 1880. He chose the army as a career, and i t was
during his training at Saint-Cyr that he developed an interest in antiquity, more par-
ticularly in ancient Egypt. He began by taking a Diploma a t the ~ c o l e pratique des
hautes Btudes with a thesis called L a prtseruation de la propridtt funtraire en ~ g y ~ t e .
The reception accorded to this work encouraged him to fresh efforts and he determined
to devote himself to the study of demotic. The war called him to his regiment and he
was unfortunately very seriously wounded in its early months. Unfit for service in the
field he was then drafted into the Intelligence Department where his time was appro-
priately spent in the study of codes and ciphers. His work in this department brought
him several mentions in despatches, the Ligion d'honneur and the Croiz de guerre.

In 1919 he was elected Professor of Egyptiari Philology at the ~ c o l e des hautes
Btudes. Here in addition to an Introduction ci Z'ttude des hidroglyphes written in collabora-
tion with M. l'abb6 Drioton he produced an important volume called Les papyrus dgmo-
tiques de Lille. He had other important work in hand when he was struck down by
influenza.

Those who knew him in these recent years cannot cease to admire the courage which
enabled him, broken in the war, unable sometinles to work for days on end, saddened
by the loss of his wife, to produce work of the highest scholarly type. He leaves a place
which i t will be hard to fill.

Dr. Alan Gardiner has spent the winter in Egypt and has visited the Society's ex- �
cavations both a t Tell el-'Amamah and at Abydos. He has now settled down in Cairo �
with Dr. de Buck to work on the collection of Middle Kingdom Coffin Texts planned by �
Professor Breasted. This work is now well advanced and proves of unexpected value not �
only frorn the religious and mythological point of view but also from the philological. �
We do not know what Professor Breasted's arrangements are for the ultimate publication �
of this immense mass of material, but we have sufficient faith in his powers of organiza- �
tion to feel sure that i t will not remain too long locked up in the form of a card catalogue �
in Chicago. Nay we further express the hope that the many duties which he bas under- �
taken will not delay indefinitely his publication of the Edwin Smith papyrus, the appear- �
ance of which is awaited anxiously not only by Egyptologists but also by medical men, �
among whom an interest in ancient medicine and the history of their art is a t present �
very widespread? �

Mr. H. I. Bell, the Society's Honorary Secretary, whom we congratulate on his com- �
plete restoration to health, has also passed part of the winter in Egypt. His Bibliography �
of Graeco-Roman Egypt which appears in this number is longer and more detailed than �

Page 7

82 NOTES AND NEWS

ever. He has been aided in his task this year by Messrs. A. D. Nock and H. J. M. Milne,
to whom our thanks are due for this service, but in spite of this help he finds that owing
to the ever increasing amount of publication the task of collecting and condensing the
material is now literally beyond his powers in the time at his disposal. It would be a
tragedy if this bibliography, one of the most valuable services rendered to Egyptology
by our Journal, should have to cease, and the Editor hopes that by distributing the work
between four or five volunteers i t may still be possible to carry on. The main difficulty
lies in the strange lack of scholars of the younger generation with the desire and the
ability to deal with work of this important kind.

According to an article which recently appeared in The Times, and which is evidently
to be regarded as official, Nr. Robert Mond finds himself forced by the demands made on
his time by his business engagements in this country to discontinue his excavations in
Egypt, which for the last two years have been carried on in the name of the University
of Liverpool Institute of Archaeology, of which Mr. Mond has for many years been a
generous friend. His retirement from the field of excavation is a serious blow to
Egyptology, but we trust that this need not involve his renunciation of the equally
important if less spectacular work of preservation of tombs. Not only every Egyptologist
but every tourist who has visited Shgkh 'Abd el-Kurnah knows what the private tombs
owe to Mr. Mond's enthusiasm and generosity.

During the past season he and his assistants, Messrs. Emery and Callender, have
been excavating a site a t Erment which appears to be that of the burial ground of the
mothers of the sacred Buchis bull. Very little news has as yet come to hand about the
site but i t is clearly one of considerable importance, if not on the magnificent scale of
the Serapeum at Alemphis, and will doubtless repay a t least one more season's excavation.

The official reports of Mr. Mond's excavations are being published in the Annals of
Archaeology and dnthropology, issued by the University of Liverpool Institute of
Archaeology. The work of the season 1924-25 appears in Vol. XIII, and that of the
following season is just about to appear in Vol. XIV. This latter report deals with a
number of the private tombs and is very fully illustrated, the plates including twelve full
page photographs of scenes in the tomb of Paheqmen.

Dr. Gardiner's Egyptian Grammar has at length appeared, and no one who has seen
and used the book will regret the long delays on which Dr. Gardiner has insisted in the
interests of conlpletion and perfection, in so far as either is possible. Professor Griffith
has undertaken the arduous task of reviewing i t in our next number.

Dr. Gardiner may be interested to know from one who has already used the book in
class that it has revolutionized the teaching of Egyptian, and that two pupils who have
been using i t have in the short time since its appearance made quite remarkable progress.

The Times newspaper has recently published articles by Dr. Reisner on the tomb 'of
Hetephers, wife of Sneferu and mother of Khufu, which he has found not far from the
Great Pyramid a t Gizah. The condition of the objects, especially those of wood, in this
tomb is such that we can only be thankful that i t has fallen into the hands of so con-
summate an excavator as Dr. Reisner, whose methods of excavation and restoration will,
we may rest assured, reconstruct as nearly as possible in its pristine form this mass of
metal and timber which thirty years ago would have been deemed fit only for the Museum
scrap heap.

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