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TitleModern Pattern Design
TagsFashion & Beauty Clothing Skirt Suit (Clothing) Softlines (Retail)
File Size6.3 MB
Total Pages315
Table of Contents
                            Foreword Modern Pattern Design (1942) by Harriet Pepin
Author’s Message to the Reader Modern Pattern Design (1942) by Harriet Pepin
Acknowledgement Modern Pattern Design (1942) by Harriet Pepin
Ch. 1 – Pattern Designing Modern Pattern Design (1942) by Harriet Pepin
Ch. 2 – Slopers Modern Pattern Design (1942) by Harriet Pepin
Ch. 3 – Hip Length Patterns Modern Pattern Design (1942) by Harriet Pepin
Ch. 4 – Sleeve Patterns Modern Pattern Design (1942) by Harriet Pepin
Ch. 5 – Adapting Patterns Modern Pattern Design (1942) by Harriet Pepin
Ch. 6 – Capes, Ties, Neckwear & Scarves Modern Pattern Design (1942) by Harriet Pepin
Ch. 7 – Collars Modern Pattern Design (1942) by Harriet Pepin
Ch. 8 – Skirts Modern Pattern Design (1942) by Harriet Pepin
Ch. 9 – Slacks, Shorts, Coulotts & Bathing Suits Modern Pattern Design (1942) by Harriet Pepin
Ch. 10 – Lingerie Modern Pattern Design (1942) by Harriet Pepin
Ch. 11 – Coats Modern Pattern Design (1942) by Harriet Pepin
Ch. 12 – Children’s Clothing Modern Pattern Design (1942) by Harriet Pepin
Summary Modern Pattern Design (1942) by Harriet Pepin
Foreword
Author's Message to the Reader
Acknowledgement
Chapter 1: Pattern Designing
	Description of Equipment
	Model Forms
	Analysis of the Feminine Silhouette
	Principles of Pattern Making
	Definitions of Patterns
	Routine Procedure
	The Shoulder Dart
	Waistline Control Block (or Sloper)
	Read Each Step Carefully Before Proceeding
	Making Final Pattern from Construction Pattern
	Completing Final Pattern
	Seam Allowances
	Pattern Symbols
	Checking Final Pattern
	Cutting the Muslin Proof
	Tracing the Muslin Proof
	Pinning the Muslin Proof
	Criticizing Your Muslin Proof
	RULE ONE
	Making the Shoulder Control Sloper
	Underarm Dart
	Making the Underarm Control Sloper
	Shortening a Dart
	The French Underarm Dart
	RULE TWO
	The Dart-Tuck
	RULE THREE
	More Information About Patterns
	Dividing the Control
	Substituting Single Dart with Multiple Darts
	Multiple Darts at the Waistline
	RULE FOUR
	Shirring or Smocking Replacing Single Dart
	RULE FIVE
	Spacing in Design
	RULE SIX
	Control Under Yoke
	Unity in Arrangement
	RULE SEVEN
	Relationship in Design
	PRACTICE PROBLEMS IN YOKE DESIGN
	Drapery in Design
	RULE EIGHT
	Balanced Drapery
	RULE NINE
	RULE TEN
	Control in Yoke Seam
	Control in Plastron Seam
	RULE ELEVEN
	RULE TWELVE
	Control with Secondary Seam
	RULE THIRTEEN
	Horizontal Center Front Control
	PRACTICE PROBLEMS
	Vertical Center Front Control
	Adaptation of Center Front Control
	Distribution of Center Front Control
	PRACTICE PROBLEM
	Cowl from Simple Center Front Control
	Average Cowl Drapery
	Deep Cowl Neckline with Vestee
	RULE FOURTEEN
	Novelty Cowl Neckline
	RULE FIFTEEN
	Cowl Yoke
	Planning Laps
	RULE SIXTEEN
	Simulated Cowl Yoke
	Novelty Simulated Cowl
	Simulated Yoke
	Simulated Plastron
	Simulated Yoke
	PRACTICE PROBLEMS
	Zippers
	Surplice Closing
	Double Breasted Closing
	Concealed Control
	Simple Rever
	Rever with Vertical Center Front Control
	Double-Breasted Novelty Rever
	Balance in Design
	Informal Balance
	Décolleté Garments, Brassiéres and Bathing Suits
Ch. 2 – Slopers
	Slopers in the Industry
	How to Take Measurements Correctly
	Where Measurements are Taken
	Chart of Garment Measurements
	A Few Instructions Always Apply
	Drafting a Front Bodice Sloper
	Drafting a Back Bodice Sloper
	Individual Measurements
	PRACTICE PROBLEMS
	Adding Ease in Front Bodice
	THE BACK SLOPER
	Analysis for Need of Control
	Shifting Control from Shoulder Neck Point
	1—To Center of Shoulder
	2—To Two Darts at Back of Neck
	3—To Multiple Darts at Back of Neck
	Shifting Control into Yoke Seam
	Moving Fundamental Seams for Sake of Design
	PRACTICE PROBLEMS
	Variations of Designs for Backs
	Eliminating Waistline Control
	Additional Practice Problems for Bodices
Ch. 3 – Hip Length Patterns
	Drafting a Front Hip-Length Sloper
	Drafting a Back Hip-Length Sloper
	Making Front and Back Hip-Length Slopers
	Semi-Fitted Jacket
	Multiple Dart Tucks
	French Lining Jacket
	Variations of French Lining
	Peplum Jackets
Chapter 4 – Sleeve Patterns
	Analysis for Need of Control
	Drafting the Sleeve Sloper
	Measurement Points
	Where Measurements are Taken
	Shaping the Sleeve Cap
	Personal Sleeve Slopers
	Fitting Sleeve Muslin
	Completing Personal Sloper
	Variations of Elbow Control
	The Folded Sloper
	Shifting Control to Little Finger Position
	Variations of Little Finger Control
	Analysis of Coat Sleeves
	Semi-Fitted Coat Sleeve
	Straight Coat Sleeve Eliminating Control
	Two-Piece Coat Sleeve
	Bishop Sleeve or Peasant Type Sleeve
	Folded Sloper Variations and Methods
	Simulated Cuffs
	Three Quarter Length Sleeves with Cuffs
	Adaptations of the Coat Sleeve Sloper
	Bell Sleeves
	Various Types of Short Puffed Sleeves
	Leg-Of-Mutton Variations
	Novelty Adaptations
	Circular Cut Novelty Sleeves
	Balanced Fullness
	Novelty Sleeves
	Cowl Sleeve
	Variation of Cowl Sleeves
	Variations of Two Pieced Sleeves
Ch. 5 – Adapting Patterns
	Analysis of Garments for Utility Purposes
	Adjustments of Armscye and Sleeve Cap for Utility Purposes
	Padding a Shoulder
	Enlarging the Sleeve
	Novelty Shoulders
	The Strap Shoulder
	The Raglan Shoulder
	The Kimono Shoulder
	The Dolman Shoulder
	PRACTICE PROBLEMS
Ch. 6 – Capes, Ties, Neckwear & Scarves
	Analysis of Cape Slopers
	How to Take Measurements for Capes
	Drafting the Dolman Cape
	Drafting the Circular Cape
	Variations of Dolman and Circular Capes
	CAPE VARIATIONS
	Bows in Fashion
	Detachable and Attached Jabots
	Detachable and Attached Revers
Chapter 7 – Collars
	Collars and Cuffs
	ATTACHED COLLARS
	Flat Collar
	Plastron Type Collar
	Bertha Collar
	Rippled Collar
	Elizabethan Collars
	Half Roll Collar
	Half Roll Sailor Collar
	Half Roll Shawl Collar
	Full Roll Collar
	Mannish Shirt Collar
	CONVERTIBLE COLLARS
	Active Sports Collar
	Variation of Active Sports Collar
	Reefer Collar
	TAILORED SUIT COLLARS
	The Single Breasted Type with Medium Closing
	ASSEMBLING CONVERTIBLE AND TAILORED SUIT COLLARS
	The Single Breasted Type with High Closing
	The Double Breasted Style
	The Single Breasted Type with Low Closing
	Tuxedo Closing
	The Single Breasted Type with Shawl Collar
	SUMMARY
	Raised Necklines
	Collarless Necklines
	Cuffs
Chapter 8: Skirts
	How to Take Measurements Correctly
	Drafting the Two-Pieced Skirt Sloper
	Analysis of Individual Skirt Slopers
	Drafting the Tailored Suit Skirt Pattern
	Multiple Darts
	Skirt Patterns Cut According to Fabric Width
	Wrap-Around Skirt (Pencil Silhouette)
	Peasant Skirts
	Simulated Peasant Skirts
	Full Circular Skirts
	Semi-Circular Skirts
	The Simulated Circular Skirt
	Multiple Gored Skirts
	Four-Gored Skirts
	Bias Four-Gored Skirt
	Narrow Four-Gored Skirt
	Six-Gored Skirt
	Eight-Gored Skirt
	Ten-Gored Skirt
	Variations of Gored Skirts
	Shifting Darts and Eliminating Seams
	Front Fullness
	Flounces
	Godets in Skirts
	Pleats in Seams
	Pleats in Gored Skirts
	Pleats in Godets
	Pleats Adjoining Yoke Panels
	Pleats in Asymmetric Design
	Pleats at an Angle—Off Grain
	Fitted Full Pleated Skirts
	Simulated Circular Pleated Skirt
	Circular Pleated Godet
	NOVELTY SKIRTS
	Back Fullness
	The Cowl Skirt
	"Peg-Top" Silhouette
	Peg-Top, 1942 Style
	Draped Skirt
	Draped Asymmetric Design
	Draped Peplum-Jabot-Wrap-Around Skirt
Chapter 9 – Slacks, Shorts, Coulotts & Bathing Suits
	How to Take Measurements Correctly
	Drafting the Mannish Slacks
	Drafting Hip-Length Sloper
	Straight Skirt Culotte
	Semi-Circular Culotte
	Variations of Slacks
	Inserted Group Pleats
	"Clam Diggers"
	Western "Frontiers"
	Bathing "Trunks"
	"Regulation Navies"
	Variations of Straight Culotte
	Straight Pleated Shorts
	Variations of Straight Pleated Shorts
	Variations of Semi-Circular Culotte
	Circular Pleated Shorts
Chapter 10: Lingerie
	Panties, Bloomers etc.
	Straight Panties
	Simulated Circular Panties
	Slips
	Bias "Bra-top" Slip
	Novelty Slip:
	Brassieres
	Nightgowns and Panamas
	Sleeping Pajamas
	Hostess Gowns
Chapter 11: Coats
	Vertical Fitting
	Seamed Waistline Fitting
	Combination Fitting
	Boxy Type Silhouette
	Swagger Type Silhouette
	Combination Fitted and Swagger Silhouette
Chapter 12: Children’s Clothing
	Analysis of Children's Figures
	How to Take Measurements Correctly
	Children's, Girls', Juniors' Measurement Chart
	Drafting the Child's Front Sloper
	Drafting the Child's Back Sloper
	Drafting the Child's Sleeve Sloper
	Adaptations of Children's Pattern Designs
	Fullness Under Yoke
	Combination Fitting
	Vertical Fitting
	HOOD
Summary
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 1

Modern Pattern
Design

Harriet Pepin

Page 2

2

Table of Contents
Foreword...................................................................................................................10

Author's Message to the Reader...............................................................................13

Acknowledgement....................................................................................................15

Chapter 1: Pattern Designing...................................................................................17

Description of Equipment...................................................................................17

Model Forms.......................................................................................................19

Analysis of the Feminine Silhouette...................................................................21

Principles of Pattern Making...............................................................................22

Definitions of Patterns........................................................................................23

Routine Procedure..............................................................................................23

The Shoulder Dart..............................................................................................24

Waistline Control Block (or Sloper).....................................................................24

Read Each Step Carefully Before Proceeding.....................................................24

Making Final Pattern from Construction Pattern.................................................26

Completing Final Pattern....................................................................................26

Seam Allowances...............................................................................................26

Pattern Symbols.................................................................................................26

Checking Final Pattern.......................................................................................27

Cutting the Muslin Proof.....................................................................................27

Tracing the Muslin Proof.....................................................................................28

Pinning the Muslin Proof.....................................................................................29

Criticizing Your Muslin Proof...............................................................................29

Making the Shoulder Control Sloper...................................................................30

Underarm Dart...................................................................................................30

Making the Underarm Control Sloper.................................................................31

Shortening a Dart...............................................................................................31

The French Underarm Dart.................................................................................32

The Dart-Tuck.....................................................................................................32

More Information About Patterns.......................................................................33

Dividing the Control...........................................................................................34

Substituting Single Dart with Multiple Darts.......................................................35

Page 157

Ch. 4 – Sleeve Patterns Modern Pattern
Design (1942) by Harriet Pepin

Bishop Sleeve or Peasant Type
Sleeve
The bishop sleeve reveals its origin in
its name. It was a type of sleeve found
in the robes of ancient priests. To the
present day it is the conventional type
found in religious vestments. It rises in
fashion favor from time to time and is
a favorite choice of theatrical
designers for dramatic costumes. It is also frequently used for costumes for
glee clubs, choirs and it has become a classic in negligee and hostess gowns.

The chief characteristic of the bishop sleeve silhouette is the bulk or
"movement" at the back of the arm only. In a later lesson, you will study the
cut of the "bell" sleeve which resembles the bishop sleeve somewhat but
produces an entirely different silhouette.

Follow the same procedure used in making the straight coat sleeve. Amount
added at back is dependent upon fabric. When sleeve is to be confined in
close fitting cuff, the new back line 3-U must equal or exceed original back
line 3-O-J to permit freedom for bending arm.

Folded Sloper Variations and Methods
Any number of sleeve designs can be developed from a
single basic sleeve silhouette. Some seasons the
silhouette may favor width at the top of the sleeve. In
another, the sleeves have width at the lower edge, or at
the elbow. Once a pleasing basic sleeve has been
produced, it may be faced, piped and trimmed in
countless ways. Once you have an understanding of the
method used to produce some silhouette, you can start
originating ingenious sleeves, which, incidentally, can provide the major style
interest in any garment. High style clothes, such as dinner gowns, negligee,
lounging pajamas, et cetera, offer endless possibility for the use of
interesting sleeves.

Provide for a closing in this sleeve as you believe it should be constructed in
final garment.

Page 158

Ch. 4 – Sleeve Patterns Modern Pattern
Design (1942) by Harriet Pepin

Simulated Cuffs
In the study of bodice cuts, you learned how to make
the simulated yoke. Here we find the simulated cuff.
For relationship in an entire garment, this sleeve could
be used with a bodice employing the use of a
simulated yoke or plastron (page 40).

The back line 3-U is first established and should equal
3-O-K to permit bending the arm. Pattern is folded on
back sleeve line 3-U, traced and opened. Then pattern is folded on line K-J
and the cuff portion traced.

It becomes apparent, due to the fact that you are working your design closer
to wrist than elbow, that the line 3-U is limited in length although it could be
extended gently from L to U to form a larger pouch in the finished sleeve.

As was the case in using this principle in bodices, a small amount must be
pinched out for the seam which tapers to nothing at point E. In many cases,
you will observe such sleeves having trimming covering the seam, such as
insertion, braiding, et cetera. Occasionally a designer will combine lace and
fabric and because there is a piecing seam introduced further up on the
sleeve, she can add more length to the back and produce an exaggerated
pouch as desired. The notch is placed at U to show where the back portion
will meet center back point K when sleeve is being constructed. Hence, the
fabric from E to U must be gathered into the cuff portion E-K.

Three Quarter Length Sleeves with Cuffs
This design produces a sleeve which has a one-piece
cuff which extends around the wrist to a closing at the
little finger position. Such cuffs are more difficult to
attach and are therefore usually found only in higher
priced garments. In some cases they are imitated in
the lower priced garments but there is a seam in the
cuff on the under side of the wrist to meet seam at
sleeve portion (at K-B). This permits assembling the
garments with the sleeves flat as they would be in many other simple styles.

If the cuff is traced off on a second piece of paper that eliminates the need
for tracing off the upper portion, as that first tracing may be used for the

http://vintagesewing.info/1940s/42-mpd/mpd-01.html#simulatedyoke

Page 314

Summary Modern
Pattern Design (1942) by Harriet Pepin

Summary
If my readers have carefully studied these pages, have faithfully rendered the
problems which have been diagramed, they have become acutely conscious of the
fact that there are but a limited number of basic, underlying principles when using
the block system of pattern making. They have become aware that there are only a
limited number of ways to introduce drapery; for adding sweep at the hemline of
the garment; for maintaining a smart fit through the careful shaping of seams.

Art in any form is governed by but very few rules. But there is one rule which is
common to all artists—the rule of accuracy. Careless mistakes will lead to
discouraging hours of correction. In this text the writer has attempted to teach
methods— the way to produce the pattern for recognized silhouettes. No mention
has been made of time-saving "short-cuts." They have little to do with the teaching
of fundamental principles and methods. It is to be assumed that each individual will
adopt time-saving methods which, when used with intelligence and accuracy, can
prove valuable to him personally. But before they can be employed, the worker
must first have a clear understanding . of the fundamental principles of his art so
that he may be confident of pleasing results in his completed design.

The block system of pattern making is an American method. It has been developed
in America by Americans. Fortunately for our American women who buy the designs
and the designers who create them, our leadership in fashion is also typically
American. No one city can claim leadership. Designers working in California may
find inspiration for one silhouette; the designers of the Middle West may be noted
for the simple wearable clothes found in the wardrobe of the majority of women;
and the Eastern designers may create the clothing of our festive hours—clothes that
bring the sparkle of gala evenings. In our broad expanse of country creators are
permitted freedom and individuality.

The true creator is a restless soul. He naturally craves constant change. And this
restlessness brings forth new ideas. The buyers select models created in various
markets and the women who go into the shops to buy find an interesting variety of
silhouettes, trimmings and colors from which to choose. This condition is a healthy
one. American women demand beautiful clothes at their own price. Fabric
manufacturers have magically produced this beauty for our designers. The
designers must be prepared to produce the beauty in line and form. In fashion art
form is silhouette. And the fashion of the hour is first manifested in the silhouette.
Beauty in form is achieved through expert cutting—through a superior knowledge of
the art of pattern making!

Almost every large city in America has at least one specialized fashion training
center where creative men and women may study. For this reason American

Page 315

Summary Modern
Pattern Design (1942) by Harriet Pepin

creative talent is not dominated. The field of creative fashion design is democratic.
The leading fashion designers in America today come from remote villages as well
as large cities. If the talent is in the hands, and those hands have been trained to
produce the ideas, success is practically assured. The ability to produce a shapely
muslin— beautiful in line and form—is sufficient to demonstrate creative talent.
Never before in the history of our country has such an opportunity awaited our
ambitious American designers.

HARRIET PEPIN

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