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Table of Contents
                            Ch 8  Industrial Robotics
Industrial Robot Defined
Robot Anatomy
Robot Anatomy
Types of Manipulator Joints
Translational Motion Joints
Rotary Motion Joints
Joint Notation Scheme
Robot Body-and-Arm Configurations
Polar Coordinate Body-and-Arm Assembly
Cylindrical Body-and-Arm Assembly
Cartesian Coordinate Body-and-Arm Assembly
Jointed-Arm Robot
SCARA Robot
Wrist Configurations
Wrist Configuration
Joint Drive Systems
Robot Control Systems
Robot Control System
End Effectors
Robot Mechanical Gripper
Advances in Mechanical Grippers
Sensors in Robotics
Robot Application Characteristics
Industrial Robot Applications
Arrangement of Cartons on Pallet
Robotic Arc-Welding Cell
Robot Programming
Leadthrough Programming
Teach Pendant for Powered Leadthrough Programming
Leadthrough Programming Advantages
Robot Programming Languages
World Coordinate System
Tool Coordinate System
Motion Programming Commands
Interlock and Sensor Commands
Gripper Commands
Simulation and Off-Line Programming
Robot Accuracy and Repeatability
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 1

©2008 Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ. All rights reserved. This material is protected under all copyright laws as they currently exist.
No portion of this material may be reproduced, in any form or by any means, without permission in writing from the publisher. For the exclusive use of adopters of the book

Automation, Production Systems, and Computer-Integrated Manufacturing, Third Edition, by Mikell P. Groover.

Ch 8 Industrial Robotics

Sections:
1. Robot Anatomy and Related Attributes
2. Robot Control Systems
3. End Effectors
4. Sensors in Robotics
5. Industrial Robot Applications
6. Robot Programming
7. Robot Accuracy and Repeatability

Page 2

©2008 Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ. All rights reserved. This material is protected under all copyright laws as they currently exist.
No portion of this material may be reproduced, in any form or by any means, without permission in writing from the publisher. For the exclusive use of adopters of the book

Automation, Production Systems, and Computer-Integrated Manufacturing, Third Edition, by Mikell P. Groover.

Industrial Robot Defined

A general-purpose, programmable machine possessing
certain anthropomorphic characteristics
Why industrial robots are important:

Robots can substitute for humans in hazardous
work environments
Consistency and accuracy not attainable by
humans
Can be reprogrammed
Most robots are controlled by computers and can
therefore be interfaced to other computer systems

Page 19

©2008 Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ. All rights reserved. This material is protected under all copyright laws as they currently exist.
No portion of this material may be reproduced, in any form or by any means, without permission in writing from the publisher. For the exclusive use of adopters of the book

Automation, Production Systems, and Computer-Integrated Manufacturing, Third Edition, by Mikell P. Groover.

Robot Control System

Hierarchical control structure of a robot microcomputer
controller

Page 20

©2008 Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ. All rights reserved. This material is protected under all copyright laws as they currently exist.
No portion of this material may be reproduced, in any form or by any means, without permission in writing from the publisher. For the exclusive use of adopters of the book

Automation, Production Systems, and Computer-Integrated Manufacturing, Third Edition, by Mikell P. Groover.

End Effectors

The special tooling for a robot that enables it to
perform a specific task
Two types:

Grippers – to grasp and manipulate objects (e.g.,
parts) during work cycle
Tools – to perform a process, e.g., spot welding,
spray painting

Page 38

©2008 Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ. All rights reserved. This material is protected under all copyright laws as they currently exist.
No portion of this material may be reproduced, in any form or by any means, without permission in writing from the publisher. For the exclusive use of adopters of the book

Automation, Production Systems, and Computer-Integrated Manufacturing, Third Edition, by Mikell P. Groover.

Simulation and Off-Line Programming

In conventional usage, robot programming languages still
require some production time to be lost in order to define
points in the workspace that are referenced in the program

They therefore involve on-line/off-line programming
Advantage of true off-line programming is that the program
can be prepared beforehand and downloaded to the
controller with no lost production time

Graphical simulation is used to construct a 3-D model
of the robot cell in which locations of the equipment in
the cell have been defined previously

Page 39

©2008 Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ. All rights reserved. This material is protected under all copyright laws as they currently exist.
No portion of this material may be reproduced, in any form or by any means, without permission in writing from the publisher. For the exclusive use of adopters of the book

Automation, Production Systems, and Computer-Integrated Manufacturing, Third Edition, by Mikell P. Groover.

Robot Accuracy and Repeatability

Three terms used to define precision in robotics, similar to
numerical control precision:

1. Control resolution - capability of robot's positioning
system to divide the motion range of each joint into
closely spaced points

2. Accuracy - capability to position the robot's wrist at a
desired location in the work space, given the limits of the
robot's control resolution

3. Repeatability - capability to position the wrist at a
previously taught point in the work space

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