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TitleFate Core Electronic.pdf
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Table of Contents
                            Go to Previous View
The Basics
	Welcome to Fate!
	What You Need to Play
	Players and Gamemasters
	The Character Sheet
	Taking Action
	Fate Points
	Start Playing!
Game Creation
	What Makes a Good Fate Game?
	Setting Up Your Game
	Making the Setting Work in Fate
	A Game’s Scale
	The Setting’s Big Issues
	Faces and Places
	Make Characters
Character Creation
	Character Creation Is Play
	Your Character Idea
	The Phase Trio
	Skills
	Stunts and Refresh
	Stress and Consequences
	You’re All Set!
	Quick Character Creation
Aspects and Fate Points
	Defining Aspects
	Defining Fate Points
	Types of Aspects
	What Aspects Do
	Making a Good Aspect
	If You Get Stuck
	Invoking Aspects
	Compelling Aspects
	Using Aspects for Roleplaying
	Removing or Changing an Aspect
	Creating and Discovering New Aspects in Play
	The Fate Point Economy
Skills and Stunts
	Defining Skills
	Defining Stunts
	Building Stunts
	The Default Skill List
Actions and Outcomes
	It’s Time for Action!
	The Four Outcomes
	The Four Actions
Challenges, Contests, and Conflicts
	Zooming In on the Action
	Challenges
	Contests
	Conflicts
	Teamwork
Running the Game
	What You Do
	What to Do During Game Creation
	What to Do During Play
	Creating the Opposition
	Playing the Opposition
Scenes, Sessions, and Scenarios
	So, Now What?
	Defining Scenarios
	Find Problems
	Ask Story Questions
	Establish the Opposition
	Set Up the First Scene
	Defining Scenes
	The Scenario in Play
	Resolving the Scenario
The Long Game
	Defining Arcs
	Defining Campaigns
	Building an Arc
	Building a Campaign
	Advancement and Change
	Defining Milestones
	World Advancement
Extras
	Defining Extras
	The Bronze Rule, aka The Fate Fractal
	Creating an Extra
	Extras and Advancement
	More Examples of Extras
Cheat Sheet
Veterans’ Guide
Character Creation Worksheet
Game Creation Worksheet
Landon’s Character Sheet
Cynere’s Character Sheet
Zird the Arcane’s Character Sheet
Character Sheet
Index
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 1

LEONARD
BALSERA

BRIAN
ENGARD

JEREMY
KELLER

RYAN
MACKLIN

MIKE
OLSON

FA
T

E
• C

O
R

E
S

Y
S

T
E

M
E

H
P

0
0

0
1

CHARACTERS LIVE AT THE
CORE OF FATE
A High Priestess of the barbarian hordes,
an undead Wild West gunslinger, and a
Second Lieutenant of the Intergalactic
Security Forces are about as di� erent
as they come, but they’ve got one thing
in common: they need a strong engine
to drive their stories.

Fate Core is that engine.

Fate Core is the latest evolution of the
award-winning Fate roleplaying game
system from Evil Hat Productions.
We’ve streamlined and clarifi ed the
rules while maintaining the system’s
trademark fl exibility. Name your game;
Fate Core can make it happen.

Inside, you’ll discover:

➤ Easy-to-follow rules for character
and world creation.

➤ Rock-solid storytelling advice for
players and GMs to produce the best
play experience.

➤ Clearly-defi ned systems to guide
players both new and old.

➤ New and improved approaches to
character actions, aspects, compels…
and more!

TELL YOUR TALE. ROLL THE DICE.
EMBRACE YOUR FATE!

EHP0001 • ISBN 978-1-61317-029-8 • $25.00 US
www.evilhat.com • @EvilHatO� cial
facebook.com/EvilHatProductions

Page 2

LEONARD
BALSERA

BRIAN
ENGARD

JEREMY
KELLER

RYAN
MACKLIN

MIKE
OLSON

FA
T

E
• C

O
R

E
S

Y
S

T
E

M
E

H
P

0
0

0
1

CHARACTERS LIVE AT THE
CORE OF FATE
A High Priestess of the barbarian hordes,
an undead Wild West gunslinger, and a
Second Lieutenant of the Intergalactic
Security Forces are about as di� erent
as they come, but they’ve got one thing
in common: they need a strong engine
to drive their stories.

Fate Core is that engine.

Fate Core is the latest evolution of the
award-winning Fate roleplaying game
system from Evil Hat Productions.
We’ve streamlined and clarifi ed the
rules while maintaining the system’s
trademark fl exibility. Name your game;
Fate Core can make it happen.

Inside, you’ll discover:

➤ Easy-to-follow rules for character
and world creation.

➤ Rock-solid storytelling advice for
players and GMs to produce the best
play experience.

➤ Clearly-defi ned systems to guide
players both new and old.

➤ New and improved approaches to
character actions, aspects, compels…
and more!

TELL YOUR TALE. ROLL THE DICE.
EMBRACE YOUR FATE!

EHP0001 • ISBN 978-1-61317-029-8 • $25.00 US
www.evilhat.com • @EvilHatO� cial
facebook.com/EvilHatProductions

Page 155

Chapter 7

cHaLLenges

A single overcome action is sufficient to deal with a straightforward goal
or obstacle—the hero needs to pick this lock, disarm this bomb, sift out a
vital piece of information, and so on. It’s also useful when the details of how
something gets done aren’t important or worth spending an intense amount
of time on, when what you need to know is whether the character can get
something done without any setbacks or costs.

Sometimes, however, things get complicated. It’s not enough to pick the
lock, because you also have to hold off the hordes of attacking zombies and
set up the magical ward that’s going to keep pursuers off your back. It’s not
enough to disarm the bomb, because you also have to land the crashing
blimp and keep the unconscious scientist you’re rescuing from getting hurt
in said landing.

A challenge is a series of overcome actions that you use to resolve an
especially complicated or dynamic situation. Each overcome action uses
a different skill to deal with one task or part of the situation, and you take
the individual results as a whole to figure out how the situation resolves.

GMs, when you’re trying to figure out if it’s appropriate to call for a chal-
lenge, ask yourself the following questions:

• Is each separate task something that can generate tension and drama
independently of the other tasks? If all the tasks are really part of the
same overall goal, like “detaching the detonator,” “stopping the timer”,
and “disposing of the explosive material” when you’re disarming a
bomb, then that should be one overcome action, where you use those
details to explain what happened if the roll goes wrong.

• Does the situation require different skills to deal with? Holding off the
zombies (Fight) while pushing down a barricade (Physique) and fixing
your broken wagon (Crafts) so that you can get away would be a good
instance for a challenge.

To set up a challenge, simply identify the individual tasks or goals that
make up the situation, and treat each one as a separate overcome roll.
(Sometimes, only a certain sequence for the rolls will make sense to you;
that’s okay too.) Depending on the situation, one character may be required
to make several rolls, or multiple characters may be able to participate.

C
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a
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, C
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147

Page 156

Fate Core

Zird the Arcane is attempting to finish the consecration ritual of
the Qirik in order to sanctify the ground of the roadside inn and
grant it the protection of the Qirik gods. Normally, this wouldn’t
be too interesting, except that he’s trying to get it done before a
horde of slavering, flesh-hungry zombies he unwittingly set free
earlier in the adventure overruns the inn.

Amanda sees several different components to this scene. First
there’s the ritual itself, then there’s keeping the inn boarded up,
and finally there’s keeping the panicking inhabitants of the inn
calm. That calls for Lore, Crafts, and some kind of social skill—
Ryan immediately chooses Rapport.

Thus, Ryan will be rolling all three of those skills separately,
one for each component Amanda identified. She sets the oppo-
sition for each of these at Good (+3)—she wants him to have
even chances, while leaving room for a variable outcome.

Now they’re ready to start.

To conduct a challenge, call for each overcome action in whichever order
seems most interesting, but don’t decide anything about how the situation
turns out until after you’ve collected all the results—you want to have the
freedom to sequence the events of each roll in the order that makes the
most sense and is the most entertaining. Players, if you get a boost on one
of your rolls, feel free to use it on another roll in the challenge, provided
you can justify it.

GMs, after the rolls have been made, you’ll consider the successes, fail-
ures, and costs of each action as you interpret how the scene proceeds. It
could be that the results lead you into another challenge, a contest, or even
a conflict.

Ryan takes a deep breath and says, “All right, let’s do this.” He
takes up the dice.

He decides to tackle securing the inn first, so he rolls his
Good (+3) Crafts skill and gets a 0 on the dice. That ties the roll,
allowing him to achieve the goal at a minor cost. Amanda says,
“I’m going to say that I get a boost called Hasty Work to use
against you if I need it—you are working fast, after all.”

Ryan sighs and nods, and then goes for the second goal in
the challenge, which is calming the locals with his Good (+3)
Rapport. He makes his roll and gets a terrible –3 on the dice! Now
he has the option to fail or to succeed with a major cost. He goes
for success, leaving Amanda to think of a good major cost.

C
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148

Page 309

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Page 310

Fate Core302

index
actions 86, 134, 174
active opposition 10, 131, 133
arcs 195, 252, 298
Armor ratings 277
aspects 3, 6, 12, 32, 34, 36, 40, 43, 44,

53, 56, 68, 76, 202, 210, 273
attack 140, 149, 153, 160
boosts 58
Bronze Rule 270
campaigns 195, 252, 298
challenges 147, 172, 173, 196
character aspects 57, 228, 245, 256
character creation 29, 262, 296
character sheet 3, 292, 293, 294, 295
compel 6, 12, 14, 71, 75, 81, 207, 211
conceding 81, 167, 299
conflicts 154, 205, 223
consequences 7, 47, 50, 58, 162, 258,

260, 273
contests 150, 173, 196
cost 274
create an advantage 70, 78, 136, 149,

153, 170, 175, 205, 223
death 168
decision compels 73
defend 142, 159
environmental hazards 208
event compels 72
exchanges 150, 159, 194
extras 6, 184, 270
faces 26, 229
fail 132, 188
Fate dice 3, 8, 130, 187
fate points 3, 12, 48, 53, 56, 68, 71, 80,

82, 167
free invocations 70
full defense 159
game aspects 24, 57, 229
game creation 17, 182, 297
gamemaster (GM) 3, 4, 82
game time 194
Golden Rule 185
high concept 32, 52
hit 140, 216
invoke 6, 12, 68, 80, 210, 299
issues 22, 57, 229
ladder 9, 46, 86
main NPCs 220

milestones 248, 255, 256, 263, 276
mobs 216
movement 169
multiple targets 205
nameless NPCs 214
non-player characters (NPCs) 4, 26,

82, 179, 213, 222, 236, 260, 266
overcome 134, 147, 169
passive opposition 10, 131, 133, 191
permission 274
phases 38, 40, 42, 44
places 26
player characters (PCs) 4, 27, 30
players 3, 4
problems 227
recovery 164
refresh 7, 49, 53, 56, 80, 87, 260
scale 21, 184
scenarios 181, 194, 226, 246, 298
scenes 155, 178, 194, 238, 240, 298
sessions 194, 298
setting 20, 182
shifts 10, 132, 140, 193
Silver Rule 185
situation aspects 58, 75, 136, 156, 170,

187
skill cap 46, 260
skill columns 258
skill pyramid 46
skills 7, 46, 53, 86, 96, 130, 202, 256,

258, 273, 283
story questions 232
story time 194, 200
stress 6, 47, 50, 86, 160, 273
stunts 7, 48, 53, 80, 87, 202, 256, 273,

299
succeed 132
succeed at a cost 132, 189
succeed with style 132
supporting NPCs 218
taken out 168
teamwork 174
tie 132
trouble 34, 53
turn order 158
Weapon ratings 277
zones 157, 169

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