Download Charge and ion dynamics in light-emitting electrochemical cells PDF

TitleCharge and ion dynamics in light-emitting electrochemical cells
LanguageEnglish
File Size6.1 MB
Total Pages237
Table of Contents
                            Title page F
Chapter 1 F
Chapter2 F
Chapter 3 F
Chapter4 F
Chapter5 F
Chapter6 F
Chapter7 F
Chapter8 F
Chapter9 V4 F
Chapter10 F
Chapter11 F
Chapter12 V3 F
Appendix F
Summary II F
Samenvatting na nakijk F
About the author F
Publication list F
Dankwoord F
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 1

Charge and ion dynamics in light-emitting electrochemical
cells : understanding the operational mechanism from
electrical transport to light generation
Citation for published version (APA):
Reenen, van, S. (2014). Charge and ion dynamics in light-emitting electrochemical cells : understanding the
operational mechanism from electrical transport to light generation. Eindhoven: Technische Universiteit
Eindhoven. https://doi.org/10.6100/IR776754

DOI:
10.6100/IR776754

Document status and date:
Published: 01/01/2014

Document Version:
Publisher’s PDF, also known as Version of Record (includes final page, issue and volume numbers)

Please check the document version of this publication:

• A submitted manuscript is the version of the article upon submission and before peer-review. There can be
important differences between the submitted version and the official published version of record. People
interested in the research are advised to contact the author for the final version of the publication, or visit the
DOI to the publisher's website.
• The final author version and the galley proof are versions of the publication after peer review.
• The final published version features the final layout of the paper including the volume, issue and page
numbers.
Link to publication

General rights
Copyright and moral rights for the publications made accessible in the public portal are retained by the authors and/or other copyright owners
and it is a condition of accessing publications that users recognise and abide by the legal requirements associated with these rights.

• Users may download and print one copy of any publication from the public portal for the purpose of private study or research.
• You may not further distribute the material or use it for any profit-making activity or commercial gain
• You may freely distribute the URL identifying the publication in the public portal.

If the publication is distributed under the terms of Article 25fa of the Dutch Copyright Act, indicated by the “Taverne” license above, please
follow below link for the End User Agreement:
www.tue.nl/taverne

Take down policy
If you believe that this document breaches copyright please contact us at:
[email protected]
providing details and we will investigate your claim.

Download date: 05. Jun. 2020

Page 2

Charge and ion dynamics in light‐emitting
electrochemical cells

Understanding the operational mechanism from electrical transport to light generation





PROEFSCHRIFT 
 
 
 
 

ter verkrijging van de graad van doctor aan de 
Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, op gezag van de 

rector magnificus prof.dr.ir. C.J. van Duijn, voor 
een commissie aangewezen door het College voor 

Promoties, in het openbaar te verdedigen  
op dinsdag 23 september 2014 om 16:00 uur 

 
 
 

door 
 
 
 

Stephan van Reenen 
 
 
 
 
 

geboren te Eindhoven

Page 118

Charge and ion dynamics in light‐emitting electrochemical cells   115 

 
density  in case we correct  for no or an underestimated  (for P3HT)  leakage current. The 

data point  itself  is based on  the  (over)estimated  leakage current and  forms  therefore a 

lower limit. A reference measurement on a cell without organic semiconductor is included 

in  supplemental  Figure 8.10. Neither  indications of  side‐reactions were observed  in  the 

measured current nor any change in color. More importantly, the leakage currents found 

here  are  approximately  an order of magnitude below  the  currents observed  in  the  full 

device,  i.e. with  the  semiconductor  present,  indicating  that  the  latter  is  dominated  by 

doping  and  not  by  leakage,  in  line  with  our  arguments  above.  In  more  detail,  in 

supplemental Figure 8.10 we calculated the associated charge densities by  integration of 

the  leakage  currents.  The  integrated  carrier  density  in  the  devices  with  organic 

semiconductor  is  at  least  larger  by  an  order  of  magnitude  than  without  the 

semiconductor,  demonstrating  that  the  extracted  doping  densities  are  maximally 

overestimated by 10 %. 

For accurate determination of  the doping density a homogeneous doping distribution  is 

required. The incomplete stabilization of the PL signal observed in Figure 8.3 indicates that 

doping  redistributes.  Likely,  ions  are  injected  in  the  film  in  a  filamentary  or  otherwise 

inhomogeneous  manner,  causing  strong  quenching  in  those  regions.  However,  the 

corresponding  density  gradients  are  unstable  and  a  redistribution  of  ions  will  follow, 

lowering the maximum concentrations and reducing the quenching. The tendency of ions 

to  redistribute  is  related  to  drift  and  diffusion,  both  in  favor  of  a  homogeneous 

distribution. Another, indirect, indication that the doping is relatively homogeneous is the 

abrupt  reduction  of  PL  versus  doping  density  as  shown  in  Figure  8.4  for  SY‐PPV. 

Inhomogeneity, i.e. the formation of doped and undoped domains would correspond to a 

more  gradual  reduction  of  the  PL  signal.  The  absence  of  substantial  inhomogeneity  is 

finally  substantiated by optical  inspection of  the device darkening during doping, which 

was found to be homogeneous within the experimental resolution of 102 µm. 

Comparison between p‐  and n‐type doping  in  SY‐PPV demonstrates  that p‐type doping 

quenches at lower carrier densities. This is in line with observations in planar LECs. In such 

cells both  types of doping are present simultaneously. The n‐type doped regions of PPV 

are typically observed to quench less than the p‐type doping regions.
15
 Here, we show that 

this  behavior  can  at  least  partially  be  explained  by  stronger  PL  quenching  by  p‐type 

doping.  A  comparison  between  P3HT  and MDMO‐PPV  shows  only  small  differences  in 

shape  and  critical  doping  density  of  PL  quenching  by  p‐type  doping. N‐type  doping  in 

MDMO‐PPV and P3HT occurred at relatively  large bias voltages at which electrochemical 

reactions with the electrolyte distort the measurements. Therefore, these measurements 

were not included. The functional shape of the quenching curve of P3HT and MDMO‐PPV 

seems to be different from that of SY‐PPV. We return to this at the end of the discussion 

section.

Page 119

116  Chapter 8 | Photoluminescence quenching by electrochemical doping 

 

 

Figure 8.5 Absorbance of  (a) p‐ and  (b) n‐type doping  in SY‐PPV at different doping  levels. The 
absorbance by doping  is determined by  subtracting  the  absorbance  at  any bias  voltage by  the 
absorbance  of  the  unbiased  cell:  Adoping  =  A(Vbias)  –  A(Vbias  =  0).  A  semi‐transparent  Au  top 
electrode was used with a thickness of 30 nm. The black arrows indicate the change in absorbance 
for  larger  doping  densities,  starting  at  zero  doping.  The  insets  show  the  normalized  PL  (gray 
dashed) and the absorbance (black solid) by doping as a function of applied bias. 

Next  to  the  effect of PL quenching  induced by doping,  the  absorption  spectrum of  the 

dopants was also measured  in SY‐PPV. The change  in absorbance by doping of SY‐PPV  is 

plotted  in  Figure  8.5(a)  and  (b)  for  p‐  and  n‐type  doping,  respectively.  The  negative 

differential absorbance at λ = 460 nm is at the same position as the absorption spectrum 

of SY‐PPV (dotted light gray line in Figure 8.2). The effect is therefore related to bleaching: 

doping fills the density of states, reducing the number of sites available for the formation 

of excitons.
12
 This bleaching is an important observation as it indicates filling of the density 

of  states of  the  light‐emitting polymer. The enhanced  transmission due  to ground  state 

bleaching of ΔT/T  2.1 (see Figure 8.5(a); the trace where a bleaching peak at λ = 460 nm 
is observed of A = ‐0.5, where ΔT/T = 10

‐A
‐1) was measured at an electrically determined 

charge  density  between  5∙10
26 

and  3∙10
27
 m

‐3
.  To  estimate  whether  these  values  are 

reasonable, we made a comparison with values obtained from Ref. 19‐20, where a relative 

enhancement in transmission by 6∙10
‐4
 was observed at a (photoexcited) charge density of 

1∙10
24
 m

‐3
. Making the reasonable assumption that bleaching is linear in density, densities 

of 5∙10
26 
and 3∙10

27
 m

‐3
 would then  lead to ΔT/T between 0.3 and 1.8, respectively. This 

value  is  in more than reasonable agreement with the ΔT/T  2.1 we measure, especially 
since  we  ignore  differences,  for  example  in  site  density,  between  the materials.  This 

confirms  that electrochemical doping of  the conjugated polymer  indeed  takes place and 

that the calculated doping density by the integration of the current is reliable.  

To determine whether the PL quenching in Figure 8.4 originates from the reduced optical 

density  as  observed  in  Figure  8.5,  the  relative  absorbance  and  the  normalized  PL  are 

plotted in the same graph in the insets in Figure 8.5a and b. For both p‐ and n‐type doping 

(a) (b)

400 500 600 700 800
-0.8

-0.6

-0.4

-0.2

0.0




A

b
so

rb
a

n
ce

wavelength (nm)

400 500 600 700 800
-0.8

-0.6

-0.4

-0.2

0.0

A
b
so

rb
a
n

ce

wavelength (nm)

0 1 2 3 4

0.0

0.5

1.0

N
o
rm

a
liz

e
d
P

L

|Bias voltage| (V)

-0.5

0.0

A
b

so
rb

a
n
c
e

0 1 2 3 4

0.0

0.5

1.0



N
o
rm

a
liz

e
d
P

L

|Bias voltage| (V)

-0.5

0.0

A
b

so
rb

a
n
c
e

Page 236

Charge and ion dynamics in light‐emitting electrochemical cells   233 

 
Van alle mensen ben  jij, Synthia, het belangrijkst voor mij geweest.  Jij motiveert me, en 

bent er voor me als het goed gaat, maar ook als het  slecht gaat.  Ik ben  zielsblij dat we 

elkaar op 31 mei 2011 het  jawoord hebben gegeven en  zie onze  toekomst, wat er ook 

gebeurt, gelukkig en samen verbonden tegemoet. 

Ten slotte wil ik God bedanken voor de voorspoed die Hij mij gedurende mijn leven tot nu 

toe gegeven heeft en daarmee de mogelijkheden om dit werk succesvol te volbrengen. Ik 

ben me bewust dat daar geen verzekering voor is, ook niet voor een christen zoals te lezen 

in de Bijbel over Job, die alles op aarde verloor, behalve zijn vertrouwen in U. Ik bid dat ik 

met Uw hulp met eenzelfde vertrouwen mag blijven geloven.

Page 237

234  Dankwoord

Similer Documents