Download CFI's Guide to Sport Pilot and Light-Sport Aircraft - FAA Flight Test PDF

TitleCFI's Guide to Sport Pilot and Light-Sport Aircraft - FAA Flight Test
LanguageEnglish
File Size1.3 MB
Total Pages16
Document Text Contents
Page 1

CFI’s Guide
to Sport Pilot
and Light-Sport
Aircraft

Courtesy of
NAFI and EAA

CFI’s Guide to Sport Pilot and Light-Sport Aircraft

The FAA regulations establishing the sport pilot certificate and light-

sport aircraft have opened the sky to countless new pilots. These

regulations gave birth to a new entry level to flying, with a means for

young and old to involve themselves in recreational aviation. At the

same time, they created opportunities for flight instructors to become

involved with both new and seasoned pilots.

The most distinct feature of this new entry level to aviation is acces-

sibility. Previously, it took 40 hours of training to become eligible to

take a practical test for a pilot certificate; the regulations now require

only 20, which drops the cost to earn a pilot certificate by 50 percent!

As costs diminish, more people will be free to consider taking up

aviation. But, not all pilots who start off seeking a sport pilot certifi-

cate will stop at the sport pilot level. Many will want to add night flying

or instrument flying privileges or will want to fly larger aircraft. Sport

pilot is an entry level for recreational aviation.

The purpose of this Guide is to serve as a handy reference for those

aviation educators currently certificated under Part 61, subpart H of

the Federal Aviation Regulations (FARs), which has recently been

retitled Flight Instructors with Other Than a Sport Pilot Rating.

P.O. Box 3086
Oshkosh, WI 54903-3086

www.eaa.org
www.sportpilot.org
1-800-JOIN-EAA

Page 2

7 Steps to Teaching Sport Pilots


1. Review the new Subpart J sport pilot rules.
2. Review the Practical Test Standards (go to

www.sportpilot.org).
3. Locate a sport pilot-eligible aircraft for instruction.
4. Inform your insurance company.
5. Select or develop sport pilot training materials.
6. Sign up to be listed on EAA’s Sport Pilot Instructor database

at www.sportpilot.org.
7. Check into DPE availability

(go to www.sportpilot.org).



























Appendix 6
Pilot Certificate Comparison - Airplane Category

Minimum Fl ight Experience-Hours Sport Pilot Recreational Pilot Private Pilot
Flight Time 20 30 40

Dual 15 15 20
Dual Cross Country 2 2 3

Solo 5 3 10
Solo Cross Country 1 0 5

Night Flight 0 0 3
Instrument Training 0 0 3

Flight Test Prep 3 3 3
Testing

Knowledge Test Yes Yes Yes
Practical Test Yes Yes Yes

Medical
Driver’s

license or 3rd
class

3rd class 3rd class

Privileges & Limitations
Day Yes Yes Yes

Night No No Yes
IFR No No Yes, with instrument rating

VFR, greater than 3 miles visibility Yes Yes Yes
VFR, less than 3 miles visibility No No Yes

VFR above clouds No No Yes
Passenger carriage 1- passenger 1- passenger Yes, no limit

Demonstrate aircraft as salesperson No No Yes, with 200 hours total time
Fly in furtherance of a business No No Yes

Tow UL hang glider or LSA glider No No Yes, with training and endorsement
Fly in charitable event No No Yes

Flight in Class A airspace No No Yes, with instrument rating

Flight in Class B, C, D airspace

Yes, with
additional

training and
endorsement

Yes, with additional
training and
endorsement

Yes

Flight in Class E and G airspace Yes Yes Yes

Flight greater than 10,000 ft. MSL No Yes, if less than 2,000 ft. AGL Yes

Cross Country Yes Yes, with training and endorsement Yes

Type of airplane Light-Sport Aircraft

4 seats, 1 engine no
more than 180 hp,

fixed gear

Less than 12,500 lbs. max
takeoff wt., higher wt. with

type rating

Fly airplane with VH faster than 87 knots
Yes, with
training

endorsement
Yes Yes

Fly airplane with VH faster than 120 knots No Yes Yes


12

Page 8

5


Light-Sport Aircraft

Sport Pilot-Eligible Aircraft
Because of the operational freedoms, relaxed medical standards, and reduced training
times accorded to sport pilots, the FAA has limited sport pilots to aircraft that are simple
to operate and easy to fly. The FAA accomplished this by defining light-sport aircraft
(LSA) by performance characteristics. To be considered an LSA, an aircraft must have
met this definition continuously since its initial certification. If this is the case, it is
considered sport pilot-eligible. An LSA is defined in FAR §1.1 as an aircraft, other than a
helicopter or powered-lift, that, since its original certification, has continued to meet the
following:


A maximum takeoff weight of not more than--
o 1,320 pounds (600 kilograms) for aircraft not intended for operation on

water; or
o 1,430 pounds (650 kilograms) for an aircraft intended for operation on

water;
o 660 pounds (300 kilograms) for lighter-than-air aircraft.

A maximum airspeed in level flight with maximum continuous power (VH) of not
more than 120 knots (138 mph) CAS under standard atmospheric conditions at
sea level.
A maximum never-exceed speed (VNE) of not more than 120 knots (138 mph)
CAS for a glider.
A maximum stalling speed or minimum steady flight speed without the use of lift-
enhancing devices (VS1) of not more than 45 knots (51mph) CAS at the aircraft's
maximum certificated takeoff weight and most critical center of gravity.
A maximum seating capacity of no more than two persons, including the pilot.
A single, reciprocating engine, if powered.
A fixed or ground-adjustable propeller if a powered aircraft other than a powered
glider.
A fixed or autofeathering propeller system if a powered glider.
A fixed-pitch, semi-rigid, teetering, two-blade rotor system, if a gyroplane.
An unpressurized cabin, if equipped with a cabin.
Fixed landing gear, except for an aircraft intended for operation on water or a
glider.
Fixed or repositionable landing gear, or a hull, for an aircraft intended for
operation on water.
Fixed or retractable landing gear for a glider.


So if the aircraft meets the above performance parameters, it is eligible to be flown by a
sport pilot. An aircraft meeting this definition may have a standard category,
experimental amateur-built, experimental-LSA, or special-LSA airworthiness certificate.

EAA prefers the term “sport pilot-eligible aircraft” to describe an aircraft that meets the
definition of an LSA, no matter how it is certificated. We feel it is less confusing since
the aircraft may not hold an airworthiness certificate that says LSA on it.

Page 9

6

Summary of a Sport Pilot-Eligible Airplane




Special Light-Sport Aircraft
The FAA regulations also created a new airworthiness category: special light-sport
aircraft (S-LSA). An S-LSA is a factory-built, ready-to-fly aircraft that has met ASTM
consensus standards for design, production, quality assurance, maintenance, and
continuing airworthiness. An S-LSA may be rented to both students and rated pilots.
They must be maintained and inspected by: (1) an FAA-certificated repairman with an
LSA maintenance rating, (2) an A&P, or (3) an authorized repair station. Pilots who have
received appropriate training may perform preventative maintenance on their S-LSA.
100-hour inspections are required for any S-LSA used for compensation or hire.

As of July 5, 2006, 30 new factory-built S-LSA airplane designs have been approved by
the FAA. To review a complete list of S-LSAs, go to EAA’s list at www.sportpilot.org and
look under “Aircraft”.

NOTE: Operating limitations are issued as part of the airworthiness certificate for all S-
LSA aircraft. FAA-issued operating limitations are “mini regulations” that govern the use
of that specific aircraft. It’s the responsibility of the pilot in command to operate the
aircraft as allowed by the operating limitations. Do not confuse operating limitations with
the Pilot’s Operating Handbook (POH); they are entirely different and unrelated
documents.


Experimental Light-Sport Aircraft
Any ultralight may obtain a registration and airworthiness certificate to become an FAA-
certificated aircraft. The FAA’s goal is to have all unregistered aircraft that do not
currently meet the definition of a FAR Part 103 single-seat ultralight convert to
experimental light-sport aircraft (E-LSA) by January 31, 2008. Two-seat E-LSA are
eligible to be used for hire for flight training through January 31, 2010.

Page 15

7 Steps to Teaching Sport Pilots


1. Review the new Subpart J sport pilot rules.
2. Review the Practical Test Standards (go to

www.sportpilot.org).
3. Locate a sport pilot-eligible aircraft for instruction.
4. Inform your insurance company.
5. Select or develop sport pilot training materials.
6. Sign up to be listed on EAA’s Sport Pilot Instructor database

at www.sportpilot.org.
7. Check into DPE availability

(go to www.sportpilot.org).



























Appendix 6
Pilot Certificate Comparison - Airplane Category

Minimum Fl ight Experience-Hours Sport Pilot Recreational Pilot Private Pilot
Flight Time 20 30 40

Dual 15 15 20
Dual Cross Country 2 2 3

Solo 5 3 10
Solo Cross Country 1 0 5

Night Flight 0 0 3
Instrument Training 0 0 3

Flight Test Prep 3 3 3
Testing

Knowledge Test Yes Yes Yes
Practical Test Yes Yes Yes

Medical
Driver’s

license or 3rd
class

3rd class 3rd class

Privileges & Limitations
Day Yes Yes Yes

Night No No Yes
IFR No No Yes, with instrument rating

VFR, greater than 3 miles visibility Yes Yes Yes
VFR, less than 3 miles visibility No No Yes

VFR above clouds No No Yes
Passenger carriage 1- passenger 1- passenger Yes, no limit

Demonstrate aircraft as salesperson No No Yes, with 200 hours total time
Fly in furtherance of a business No No Yes

Tow UL hang glider or LSA glider No No Yes, with training and endorsement
Fly in charitable event No No Yes

Flight in Class A airspace No No Yes, with instrument rating

Flight in Class B, C, D airspace

Yes, with
additional

training and
endorsement

Yes, with additional
training and
endorsement

Yes

Flight in Class E and G airspace Yes Yes Yes

Flight greater than 10,000 ft. MSL No Yes, if less than 2,000 ft. AGL Yes

Cross Country Yes Yes, with training and endorsement Yes

Type of airplane Light-Sport Aircraft

4 seats, 1 engine no
more than 180 hp,

fixed gear

Less than 12,500 lbs. max
takeoff wt., higher wt. with

type rating

Fly airplane with VH faster than 87 knots
Yes, with
training

endorsement
Yes Yes

Fly airplane with VH faster than 120 knots No Yes Yes


12

Page 16

CFI’s Guide
to Sport Pilot
and Light-Sport
Aircraft

Courtesy of
NAFI and EAA

CFI’s Guide to Sport Pilot and Light-Sport Aircraft

The FAA regulations establishing the sport pilot certificate and light-

sport aircraft have opened the sky to countless new pilots. These

regulations gave birth to a new entry level to flying, with a means for

young and old to involve themselves in recreational aviation. At the

same time, they created opportunities for flight instructors to become

involved with both new and seasoned pilots.

The most distinct feature of this new entry level to aviation is acces-

sibility. Previously, it took 40 hours of training to become eligible to

take a practical test for a pilot certificate; the regulations now require

only 20, which drops the cost to earn a pilot certificate by 50 percent!

As costs diminish, more people will be free to consider taking up

aviation. But, not all pilots who start off seeking a sport pilot certifi-

cate will stop at the sport pilot level. Many will want to add night flying

or instrument flying privileges or will want to fly larger aircraft. Sport

pilot is an entry level for recreational aviation.

The purpose of this Guide is to serve as a handy reference for those

aviation educators currently certificated under Part 61, subpart H of

the Federal Aviation Regulations (FARs), which has recently been

retitled Flight Instructors with Other Than a Sport Pilot Rating.

P.O. Box 3086
Oshkosh, WI 54903-3086

www.eaa.org
www.sportpilot.org
1-800-JOIN-EAA

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