Download Ammonia Technology PDF

TitleAmmonia Technology
TagsCarbon Dioxide Natural Gas Ammonia Catalysis
File Size6.6 MB
Total Pages16
Document Text Contents
Page 1

Topsøe ammonia technology

Page 8

Heat exchange reforming (HTER)
The HTER (Haldor Topsøe Exchange Reformer) is a relatively
new feature, initially developed for use in synthesis gas plants. In
ammonia plants this unit is operated in parallel with the primary
reformer. The advantage of the HTER is that it reduces the size
of the primary reformer and at the same time it reduces the HP
steam production.

Therefore, the HTER is found to be particularly well suited in
large capacity plants (especially stand-alone ammonia plants
not requiring a large steam export to a urea plant) as well as in
revamp scenarios where the reforming section is the bottleneck.

The principle of the HTER is that reaction heat is provided by
the exit gas from the secondary reformer, and thereby the waste
heat normally used for HP steam production can be used for
the reforming process down to typically 750–850°C, depending
upon actual requirements. Operating conditions in the HTER are
adjusted independently of the primary reformer in order to get
the optimum performance of the overall reforming unit.

Typically up to around 20% of the natural gas feed can in this
way by-pass the primary reformer.

The first reference for an HTER has been in successful operation
in a synthesis gas producing plant in South Africa since 2003.
The HTER concept is also widely used in the design of high
capacity hydrogen plants.

Secondary reforming
In ammonia plants the methane reforming reaction from the
primary reformer is continued in the secondary reformer. The
addition of air in the secondary reformer provides oxygen for the
combustion of the leftover methane. Furthermore, the nitrogen
for the ammonia is introduced to the process.

Page 9

Topsøe burner technology
A critical parameter for satisfactory secondary or autothermal
reformer performance is efficient mixing of the process gas and
air or oxygen. Uneven mixing can result in large temperature
variations above and into the catalyst bed, causing variations
in the degree of methane reforming achieved and often yielding
a poor overall approach to reforming equilibrium, even with a
highly active secondary reforming catalyst.

The efficiency of gas mixing is primarily a function of the burner
design. In addition to causing inefficient gas mixing, a poorly
designed burner can damage the vessel walls, refractory or even
the burner itself due to impingement of hot gas and/or flame in
these areas.

Topsøe has done extensive research to optimise the burner
design to eliminate the problems described above, and offers
two special burners. For air-blown secondary reformers in
ammonia plants, we offer a ring-type burner with a specialised
nozzle shape that eliminates back-flow of hot gas onto the
nozzles themselves, thereby reducing mechanical wear and
damage to the burner.

In autothermal and oxygen-blown secondary reformers, the
enriched air or oxygen is typically supplied at high pressures,
thereby allowing for the possibility of a higher pressure drop
across the reactor burner. For these services, Topsøe offers the
CTS burner.

Figure 3 illustrates a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model of a
Topsøe-designed ring-type burner. The Topsøe nozzle does not experience
impingement of hot gas back-flow and therefore is able to operate for much
longer periods without need for repair or replacement compared to burners
of conventional design.

Figure 2 illustrates a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) profile of a CTS
burner, illustrating the maintenance of low temperatures at the vessel walls
and an efficient gas circulation pattern, thereby producing optimal mixing
and minimising reactor damage.

Page 15

The Topsøe approach to quality

��������������
�������������������������������� ��������
�������������������
���������������������������
����������������
��
���������������������������
������������
����
�����
��
������
�������������������

������ ���
��������
������������������������
��������������
����������
��������
��������
�����������������������������
��
�������
��
����
����������������������
�������������������
����� ��� ����������
���
���
���
���������

Continued improvement

��������������� �
������ ������������� ���������
����
�����������
������
�����������������������������
�������� ����
����
����������������������������������������������������
���
��
�������������
�������������
������������

¢������
���
����������������
����������
��������
�����
�����������������
�������
��������������������������������������
�����
��������
����
����������������������������������
� ������
��� ������������
�����������������
��������
�����
������������
��������
�������������
��������
������
��������
������� �������

��
�������
����
�������������
�������������������

������ ��������� �������������������
������������������
���
��������������������������
����������������������������������
��������������
���������������������������������� ����������
����������
�����������������������������������
���� �����
���
���

������������
���������
��

��������������� ����
�����


Page 16

�����
��������������ƒ��������›�����������§�������� ���������

�����¤£��£����������������¤£��£�����⁄⁄⁄�����������������

��������
�����������
�������������������� �����
���
��� ������������������������������
���
���������������������������������������
��������
����������
��������������� ���������
������
�����������
�������
������������������������������ ��������
���������
����������������������
 ��
��������
���
��������ƒ���������
���������� �������
�������
�����������������
��������
�����

��������������������������������
������

����������










��

��


��


��





��

Similer Documents