Download Aircraft Systems - Chapter 07 PDF

TitleAircraft Systems - Chapter 07
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Total Pages40
Document Text Contents
Page 1

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Aircraft Systems

Chapter 01 airframe Design anD materials

» Introduction
» Certification Standards
» Design Concept
» Loads and Stresses
» Ultimate Load and Limit Load
» Fatigue
» Material Properties
» Composites
» Summary of Material Properties
» Corrosion
» Maintenance Methods

Chapter 02 maJOr airframe COmpOnents

» The Major Airframe Components
» Material Attachment Methods
» Construction Principles
» The Fuselage
» The Pressure Hull
» The Wings
» Torsional Stresses and Flutter
» The Empennage

Page 2

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Chapter 03 sUBsiDiarY airframe strUCtUres

» Introduction
» The Floor
» Doors and Hatches
» Flight Deck Windows
» Passenger Cabin Windows

Chapter 04 hYDraUliC prinCiples

» Introduction
» Hydraulic Principles
» Hydraulic Power
» Hydraulic Fluid Requirements
» Advantages and Disadvantages of Hydraulic Systems
» A Elementary Hydraulic System

Chapter 05 hYDraUliC sYstems

» Overview
» Actuators
» Basic System Components
» Hydraulic Circuits
» Light Aircraft Systems
» Large Aircraft System Components
» Large Aircraft Systems
» Emergency and Auxiliary Power Sources

Page 20

Issue 1 7.12

AGK - Systems Wheels, Tyres and Brakes

When inspecting tyres for damage look out for:

JJ Cuts. Any cuts to the cords or sidewall require the tyre to be
replaced.

JJ Bulges. Unusual bulges especially around sidewall areas are a sign
of impending tyre failure.

JJ Foreign object damage. Ensure no stones, fasteners, glass or
metal are embedded in the tyre.

JJ Contamination. Ensure no hydraulic oil or engine oil has been
spilled onto the tyre.

JJ Creep. Check that the creep marks are overlapping.

JJ Wear. If the tyre is worn beyond the acceptable limit it must be
replaced.

JJ Pressure. Over inflation may lead to blow out and excess wear.
Under inflation leads to tyre creep, excess wear and possible tyre
failure. Commercial aircraft tyres are normally inflated with nitrogen.

Page 21

Issue 1 7.13

AGK - Systems Wheels, Tyres and Brakes

Aquaplaning

Aquaplaning is a phenomenon in which a wedge of water builds up
at the front of the tyre and, as speed increases, starts to lift the tyre
off the surface. A fully aquaplaning tyre will have no contact with the
surface and may even stop rotating altogether.

Aquaplaning may result in reduced or no braking ability, loss of
directional control and damage to the tyre from superheated steam
generated by the friction forces between water, tyre and surface.

figure 7.9
Aquaplaning

Page 39

Issue 1 7.31

AGK - Systems Wheels, Tyres and Brakes

The Parking Brake

The parking brake allows brake pressure to the wheel brakes to be
applied and held applied.

The parking brake is usually set using a lever. On some systems the
parking brake lever must be applied simultaneously with the toe brakes
to engage the system.

When the parking brake is set to on it overrides all other braking
systems including anti-skid and touch-down protection. For this reason
you must never set the parking brake on in flight.

Furthermore, the parking brake should not be set on if your brakes are
excessively hot (more than 500°C on the Boeing 737). Applying parking
brake in these circumstances increase the risk of the rotors welding to
the stators.

Page 40

Issue 1 7.32

AGK - Systems Wheels, Tyres and Brakes

0

5

10

15
APL
NOSE UP

STAB
TRIM

APL
NOSE

DOWN

TA
K

E
-O

FF

0

5

10

15
APL
NOSE
UP

STAB
TRIM

APL
NOSE
DOWN

TA
K

E
-O

FF

STAB TRIM
NORMAL

MAIN
ELEC

AUTO
PILOT

CUT
OUT

PARKING
BRAKE
PULL

FLAP

SPEED BRAKE

FLIGHT
DETENT

UP

ARMED

DOWN

FLAP
UP

0

1

2

5

15

10

25

30

40

HORN
CUTOUT

FLAP
DOWN

Parking Brake
Lever

Parking Brake
Warning Light

Landing Gear
Warning Horn
Cutout Switch

figure 7.23
Location of parking brake lever

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